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Legislature forced to postpone discussions over bill, resolution

TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The Legislative Yuan yesterday decided to postpone discussions on the reconsideration of a previous resolution to submit the various versions of the cross-strait pact oversight bill for committee deliberation and to postpone discussions on the bill proposed by the Kuomintang (KMT) to revise the Civil Servants Election and Recall Act.

Opposition lawmakers seized the rostrum yesterday morning to prevent the Legislature from handling the two issues, forcing a round of cross-caucus negotiations.

Before hosting the negotiations, Legislative Yuan Speaker Wang Jin-pyng (王金平) said that the opposition doesn't want to see the aforementioned resolution and bill listed on the Yuan Sitting agenda, and that the opposition proposed to list more than 200 bills on the agenda, requesting that each be voted on twice.

Although the opposition's demand complies with regulations, it would take more than three days to vote on the more than 200 bills, Wang added.

At noon, a recess was called, after which ruling party and opposition lawmakers spoke to the press.

KMT lawmaker Lin Hung-chih (林鴻池) said the opposition has seized the rostrum 41 times in total this term, adding that the opposition is poised to break last term's record.

Lin said that negotiations lasted two hours in the morning, during which the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) caucus first requested a reconsideration of the daily agenda passed last week, and that the opposition later proposed to place more than 200 bills on the agenda, threatening to “boycott” the upcoming Yuan Sitting through a lengthy voting process.

DPP lawmaker Gao Jyh-peng (高志鵬) said that if ruling party lawmakers choose to continue their fight against his caucus instead of communicating, the Legislative Yuan will not see a day of peace.

Although the DPP is not looking for a fight, it will not back away from a fight, Gao said.

DPP Legislator Wu Ping-jui (吳秉叡) said that his caucus supports immediately holding a comprehensive election to select new lawmakers, and that the opposition has nothing to fear.

'Tyranny of the minority'

President Ma Ying-jeou was quoted as describing the Democratic Progressive Party's actions as “absurd” during a weekly KMT meeting.

This is the 41st time that the DPP has seized the rostrum this term, Ma reportedly said, adding that the opposition's actions exemplified a “tyranny of the minority,” leading the nation away from the principles of democracy and the rule of law.

1 Comment
May 14, 2014    kingsolomon@
As has been observed a long time, this party (DPP) is fit only for the streets and sidewalks, like what they have been doing (holding office on chungshan south road) for the past how many years. They want to show the world that they belong there. For eight years that they've been at the helm of government before, all that can be remembered were the rallies, strikes and demonstrations (and violent ones, at that). This party's trademark and specialty is rabble rousing, organizing rallies and demonstrations. Now they desperately want to win back and be the masters so they can pardon their convicted leaders and party mates.
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Ruling party lawmakers hold a press conference at the Legislative Yuan, yesterday. President Ma Ying-jeou was quoted as describing the Democratic Progressive Party's attempt at stalling legislative proceedings as “absurd” during a separate meeting. (CNA)

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