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June 25, 2017

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DPP leaders attend protest rally at Presidential Office

TAIPEI--Opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) leaders, including Chairman Su Tseng-chang, attended a demonstration in Taipei Sunday to display their solidarity with protesters opposed to a controversial trade-in-services pact with China.

Dressed in black, Su and his predecessors Tsai Ing-wen, Frank Hsieh and Yu Shyi-kun, as well as former Vice President Annette Lu, showed up at the protest rally on Ketagalan Boulevard in front of the Presidential Office.

Earlier, the DPP's central committee had instructed its members who will take part in year-end elections not to attend the demonstration wearing their election campaign vests. In addition, election flags and campaign vehicles were prohibited at the protest sites.

Describing the student protesters as taking the leading role of the demonstration, Su said that like any other citizen of the country, he joined the protest to demonstrate the power of the people in the protection of democracy.

Meanwhile, former DPP chief Tsai Ing-wen said she showed up to cheer on the protesters.

Although the government has made some goodwill responses to the protesters' demands, there is still a distance between the responses and the demands, Tsai said. Now the ball is in President Ma Ying-jeou's court, she added.

Sunday's protesters, who fear that the services trade accord under which Taiwan and China will open their doors to each other's service sectors will harm small and medium-sized businesses in Taiwan and cut local employment opportunities, numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

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