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ROC denies citizenship to American priest who dedicated life to children

TAIPEI, Taiwan -- An American priest who has dedicated his life in the past half-century to underprivileged children in Taiwan was unable to realize his ambition to become a naturalized R.O.C. citizen. Current laws prevent him from doing so, an official told a local newspaper yesterday.

Seventy-eight-year-old Father Brendan O'Connell, the founder of several local foundations that take care of children with delayed development issues, has dedicated himself to the welfare of needy Taiwanese ever since he first arrived in the country 50 years ago, the Chinese-language United Evening News said yesterday.

He was previously granted permanent residency for his contribution to the nation.

However, for years, Father O'Connell has repeatedly expressed his wish to be granted Taiwanese citizenship and to obtain an R.O.C. Nationality Identification Card so that he can become a true Taiwanese, the report said.

But related authorities have denied his application.

The Ministry of the Interior's (MOI) Department of Household Registration Director Chang Wan-yi (張琬宜) told the newspaper yesterday that the current R.O.C. Nationality Act (國籍法) stipulates that a foreign national who applies for naturalization shall first provide proof of his or her loss of previous nationality.

The regulation makes it difficult for a foreign national who wishes to obtain R.O.C. nationality, she said.

Many foreign nationals who wish to obtain Taiwanese nationality have faced similar problems because of the rule, she added.

To solve this problem once and for all, Chang said the MOI has recently drafted an amendment to the act that stipulates that foreign nationals who have made significant contributions to Taiwan will be granted R.O.C. nationality without having to give up their former nationality.

The amendment also applies to foreign nationals with special skills who wish to become Taiwanese citizens, she said.

The amendment is currently under review by lawmakers, she said.

March 16, 2014    Upwell@
Therein lies the unfairness. There must be a fair number of Taiwanese holding dual or more citizenships as a matter of choice. They do not need to give up their Taiwanese citizenship. Other nations have given them that privilege without any special rules. These nations are broad minded enough. Yet Taiwan dealing with citizens of other nations demands differently. Even with the proposed new law, it asked for "special skill" to be proven. If I am this old gentleman, I can't be bothered. It's not a question of meeting this requirement. But it's a matter of principle and self respect. Having given the best of the years of one's life to be rejected a small request from the Taiwanese brings about a sour note to his sunset years. Surely a poor reflection of this nation. This elderly generation probably should return to his motherland as at the end of it all, surely that's where your roots started and where they will end. The foreign land will always treat you different despite your selfless contribution.
March 22, 2014    jim@
If he really wants to be Taiwanese he can renounce.

I renounced my Australia Citizenship in 1998 to do just that. PS Australia did not allow dual nationality back then as well. I do agree though that those making significant contributions be exempted from renouncing.
March 24, 2014    ludahai_twn@
jim@ wrote:
If he really wants to be Taiwanese he can renounce.

I renounced my Australia Citizenship in 1998 to do just that. PS Australia did not allow dual nationality back then as well. I do agree though that those making significant contributions be exempted from renouncing.
Taiwan recognizes dual citizenship. It seems strange that a Taiwanese can go to another country, obtain citizenship while retaining their Taiwanese citizenship yet Taiwan won't allow the same for someone wishing to nationalize as a Taiwanese. Hypocritical KMT laws at work again.
March 26, 2014    jim@
Well each country has a right to decide about citizenship. One of the EU countries allows dual nationality but immigrants are required to renounce first, just like Taiwan.

In any case, if the priest really wanted to be "Taiwanese" then why does he need to keep his US citizenship? For convenience only?

I decided I wanted to become a citizen here. Went to the MOI in 1988 and they advised the procedure. Renunciation being required.

Should I have complained when Australia allowed immigrants to have dual nationality but Australians who got citizenship overseas lost theirs? Pointless argument. If someone really wants citizenship here then they will do what is required.
March 26, 2014    sewiyu@
Anyone who applies for dual citizenship is doing it purely for convenience... One just can't pledge an allegiance to two separate authorities; much like one can't have both feet on two boats. Some countries do have dual citizenships, but they mostly evolved as a colonial republic... Most notably those that were rooted in the British colonial empire. So why not have the president of ROC grants an honorary citizenship to the priest? Changing the law to accommodate an extraordinary individual or a special interest group seems out of line... My opinion.
March 27, 2014    curtisakbar@
What EU country do you speak of Jim, I would be interested to know, as the European Court of Human Rights would take a dim view of such a quagmire.
March 28, 2014    jim@
Bulgaria has this requirement. Persons who have greatly contributed to Bulgarian society are not required to renounce their previous citizenship but all others must do so. Please also note many EU countries do not allow dual nationality.

Germany now does but only for other EU citizens. It does not allow dual nationality normally. Also Austria, Denmark, Netherlands and some other well known EU countries do not allow dual nationality.
European Court of Human Rights does not govern citizenship of EU countries. So your idea they would take a dim view is actually unfounded. Germany, Holland and several other countries require renunciation to get those citizenships.

Point is that nearly 70,000 immigrants have become Citizens of the ROC since 2000.
Why should the government change the law for just a few people who feel they are too special to renounce their previous nationality? After all didn't the priest claim he wanted to be "Taiwanese"

I have been called a race traitor on expat forums in Taiwan here for having renounced my Australian Citizenship and calling myself "Taiwanese"

Citizenship by naturalization is not a right but a privilege and comes with conditions attached. Many people who immigrate to Taiwan also come from countries that do not allow dual nationality as well.
Yes a few like USA, Canada, and UK do but we aren't immigrating to those countries.

Sewiyu, several ex British ruled colonies also do not allow dual nationality. India Singapore Malaysia etc
March 28, 2014    curtisakbar@
sewyu

ROC does allow dual citizenship that is the problem. Once you have ROC ID you can have as many nationalities as you want.
March 28, 2014    taipeir2001@
It's a principle of fairness, if native born Taiwanese can hold dual citizenship, and PRC citizens in Taiwan can, why can't foreigners who come to Taiwan and pay their taxes and dues.

There's more for Taiwan to win than lose. It's not like the place is mobbed with people who want to immigrate here!
March 28, 2014    jim@
PRC citizens cannot hold dual citizenship. China does not allow dual nationality and PRC Citizens who take up Taiwan’s Hukou and get Taiwan ID cards lose their PRC Hukou and ID Card and citizenship. They cannot have both.

Foreigners who immigrate here and become ROC Citizens can hold dual nationality. All ROC Citizens are allowed dual nationality. The issue for USA Canada is that unlike UK you cannot resume your citizenship if you renounce it. UK can. So go change your own government’s policies if you don't like them. Got nothing to do with getting ROC Citizenship.

Everyone resident here who qualifies can get ROC Citizenship. 70,000 immigrants to ROC have done just that since 2000. Many others like the priest have APRC's. The priest could get ROC citizenship if he really wanted to. After all what's the point of having a US passport in Taiwan if you really want to be Taiwanese. Very few Taiwanese (as a percentage of the nation) have dual nationality. Did I need to keep my Australian citizenship to be Taiwanese? No.

ROC allowing its citizens to have dual nationality is not an in issue. That's the privilege of being an ROC Citizen. There are lots of immigrants who come to Taiwan.

US Citizens make up less than 2% of foreign residents in Taiwan. Why should they be treated so special?
March 29, 2014    ludahai_twn@
Jim, you are missing the point. Sure there are many countries that do not recognize dual citizenship. At least they are being consistent.

Taiwan recognizes dual citizenship. Many people are born with it, like my daughters. Taiwanese can go abroad and become citizens of states that recognize it (like the United States) and retain their Taiwanese nationality. However, in most cases, immigrants to Taiwan may NOT become Taiwanese citizens without renunciation. THIS is where the hypocrisy of the KMT law resides.
March 30, 2014    happy.chatting@
Dear ludahai_twn, Please elaborate why this is a "KMT" specific issue? There have been non-KMT governments in Taiwan before, remember? As far as I know, the current sitting KMT never changed the law, thus why pinpoint this issue to a political party? There are already enough people trying to blame parties just based on the word of mouth instead of rationality and actual facts.

This issue cannot be oversimplified by "countries which do or do not allow dual citizenship.” Laws are complicated ad may have many condition. Moreover, each country may have specific conditions.

Jim, in contrast to your statement, the Netherlands stipulate that Dutch citizens do NOT LOSE their nationality as long as the person is MARRIED to a foreigner. Foreigners can OBTAIN Dutch nationality as long they have been married for 3 years with a Dutch and lived in Holland for 15 years. This shows that specific conditions apply. This is also where Taiwan law differs and hopefully Taiwan could consider to flex the law a bit so that foreigners can enjoy the same rights as their citizens and thus also can vote and chose the government they pay their taxes to.
March 31, 2014    curtisakbar@
Jim,

If the country doesn't allow dual citizenship then of course you need to renounce, but countries like Taiwan allow citizens to have dual nationalities.

As for Bulgaria requiring people to renounce their citizenship despite allowing dual nationality, this rule doesn't apply to EU citizens. Yes, I know it is geographically racist but is in accordance to EU human rights. A member state cannot discriminate between its nationals and those of the EU.

There are several high profile cases that the European Court has ruled on regarding citizenship/residence and the equal treatment of EU nationals such as the Surinder Singh.

For people calling you a race traitor, perhaps you should avoid skinheads in Taiwan forums or keep to a higher level of discussion and tell them that race and nationality aren't one and the same. You being an "Aussie" in Taiwan can use the fact the Aboriginals in Taiwan and Australia are both the native races of the countries in question but due to immigration the European and Chinese have come to be the dominant people in these countries and although racially they aren't from these lands, their nationality is.
March 31, 2014    joe1@
I like Taiwan, but there is no reason I would ever want to give up my current citizenship for one here. For what reason exactly?

Jim, no matter what your shenfenzhang says, you are still a foreigner here, in the minds of everyone else, sorry about that.
April 1, 2014    jim@
Actually Joe on that point about me being regarded as a foreigner you are so wrong. I get treated the same as any other citizen here. It’s mainly foreigners who assume otherwise as they have no experience themselves as being a citizen here. What a joy it is.

Curtis Australia before did not allow Australians dual nationality but incoming migrants were allowed to obtain Aus Citizenship and keep their own. No renunciation required. Was that fair to Australians lol.

PS I am not missing the point. The ROC government requires renunciation to get local citizenship. So suck it up if you want it. I did.

Curtis as I wrote, each country has its own rules, IE Dutch as happy chappy chatting mentioned. Well I am not married to one so if I immigrated to Holland I would need to renounce to become a Dutch Citizen.

I don't see any of you complaining about other countries citizenship rules? Just need to do like I did and suck it up. Anyway Taiwan is my home and I only need citizenship of my home country, nowhere else.

PS I am not an Aussie in Taiwan. It's people like you with that type of thinking who are wrong. I am a Taiwanese in Taiwan. Pretty much only bigots tell me this on a regular basis that I am still a foreigner here. Funny thing is they outnumber local citizens here by about 10,000 to 1.

I would like to see the law changed but if it isn't I'm not going to cry about it. I've made my decision to become a citizen here and been listening to the same arguments for the last 16 years I've been a citizen here. f course before it was how worthless a Taiwan passport was or how Taiwan wasn't part of the UN. Even Switzerland didn't join the UN until 2002. Guess all those Swiss didn't come from a country either then?

If you are not prepared to give up your citizenship to become a citizen then here stop bitching about the law. Taiwan doesn't need to give out citizenship for those wanting it for convenience only. Keep your JFRV or APRC's they are good enough surely?
April 2, 2014    jim@
ludahai_twn yes your daughters got ROC citizenship by birth from an ROC Mother.

My son born in Taiwan to an ROC mother did not as he was born in 1991 and at that time citizenship was only granted through the father. The law changed in 2000 to allow it to children born of ROC mothers.
April 3, 2014    ludahai_twn@
happy.chatting@ wrote:
Dear ludahai_twn, Please elaborate why this is a "KMT" specific issue? There have been non-KMT governments in Taiwan before, remember? As far as I know, the current sitting KMT never changed the law, thus why pinpoint this issue to a political party? There are already enough people trying to blame parties just based on the word of mouth instead of rationality and actual facts.

This issue cannot be oversimplified by "countries which do or do not allow dual citizenship.” Laws are complicated ad may have many condition. Moreover, each country may have specific conditions.

Jim, in contrast to your statement, the Netherlands stipulate that Dutch citizens do NOT LOSE their nationality as long as the person is MARRIED to a foreigner. Foreigners can OBTAIN Dutch nationality as long they have been married for 3 years with a Dutch and lived in Holland for 15 years. This shows that specific conditions apply. This is also where Taiwan law differs and hopefully Taiwan could consider to flex the law a bit so that foreigners can enjoy the same rights as their citizens and thus also can vote and chose the government they pay their taxes to.
Very simple. It is the KMT who passed the law. You say that there has been a non-KMT administration, this is true. However, the administration does not pass laws, the legislature does. And though Chen was president for eight years, the KMT/pan-Blue alliance controlled the legislature during those eight years, so your point has no basis in fact.

Furthermore, the DPP has proposed making a change. However, the KMT caucus in the Legislative Yuan and President Ma have expressed opposition to the change.

Most Taiwanese are unaware of these laws. When I make people aware of them, most think they are nonsensical.
April 3, 2014    curtisakbar@
Jim

If you noticed I put inverted commas around the word Aussie, meaning that it was just to reference your past. Not to burst you bubble but you're not Taiwanese. Taiwanese are the Aboriginals, the Formosans. You my friend are a Republic of China national.

You say you get treated like any other citizen here, I doubt that a lot. I bet you still get called "foreigner" on the street, or do you mean treated like mixed kids and other new nationals?

I am not attacking you, I just know that how you look means a lot in this country.
April 4, 2014    jim@
Curtis, sorry to burst your bubble but yes I am treated just like any other citizen. How would you know how I am treated when you don't even know who I am or have shared my experiences? Perhaps because you feel like a foreigner living in this country you are projecting your own views on how it would be for me.

Any ROC Citizen, (not national, ROC Nationals have Taiwan passport but no ID card or citizenship. I was a national before I became a citizen) is Taiwanese. Any person who doesn't accept that is just bigoted.

Yes my Caucasian background is noticed more often than say other immigrants from S.E.A. who immigrate here and become citizens here. However as for being a citizen, I was in Taipei last year and needed to get an International Drivers License. I went to the Bada Rd motor vehicle registry office, took a number, got called to the counter. The lass asked me what I wanted and I told her an IDL, she just asks me for my ID card, license and passport photographs. I asked her why she thought I had an ID card and not an ARC. She replied I speak with a local accent so have lived here long enough she was not surprised I have an ID card. Its not that uncommon. Hundreds of thousands of migrants here and lots of them are citizens here. We get called the new Taiwanese and people here really have no problem with immigration here.

Foreigners here can enjoy the same rights as citizens here, just become a citizen here. It isn't hard to do but it does take time for the processing.

ludahai, when I applied married or not it was 7 years required residency and now its 3 years if married to a citizen here, or 5 years if not. So yes like Holland the rules are specific. But we aren't immigrating to Holland so who cares what Holland’ rules are.

If citizenship here is that important to you as if was for me, then you would do what is necessary to become a citizen here. The rules are what they are. If you want them changed then go protest about them to the government here. I see no need for the rules to change to satisfy a few people who say its not that important to have citizenship here.

I live my life like a local citizen, I vote, I get credit cards by just filling out a form, I get bank loans, I own businesses here, have laobao and superannuation etc etc. Just another citizen going on with his life.
April 4, 2014    swalker74@
Curtis, you are really heading into the realm of the absurd very quickly with your comments. Your claim that only the aboriginals are Taiwanese just doesn't correspond with common use of the term. Taiwanese means any local citizen, not just the aboriginals. By your logic, Jim is not Aussie either, as he is not an Aussie aborigine. If you are American, South African, Canadian or citizen of any settler nation, you are not a citizen of your home country either, as those places have aboriginal populations and, according to you, they are the only citizens.

And as far as ROC national vs Taiwanese, you are really getting absurd there. No further comment needed.

As far as being called "foreigner," sure being Caucasian will likely mean sticking out a bit here, even after naturalizing. However, the comments mainly come from those who don't know you. Those who do will have no issue with it, apart from a small minority of bigots (tell me your country has none of those).

Jim feels comfortable in his own skin here as a Taiwanese (or ROC national as you put it). Why can't you just accept that? I always wonder why some "foreigners" feel the need to monopolize expat and immigrant experiences here. If someone feels comfortable, fully acclimatized, accepted and even proud as a Taiwanese, who are you to say otherwise?

As for renunciation, yes, I would like to see laws changed. However, they are what they are. Someone who has lived most their life here and never plans to leave should just renounce and get it over with. I have several friends (Caucasians) who have done so, and I've advised several others who don't intend to leave to do the same.

April 4, 2014    jim@
curtisakbar@ wrote:
Jim

If you noticed I put inverted commas around the word Aussie, meaning that it was just to reference your past. Not to burst you bubble but you're not Taiwanese. Taiwanese are the Aboriginals, the Formosans. You my friend are a Republic of China national.

You say you get treated like any other citizen here, I doubt that a lot. I bet you still get called "foreigner" on the street, or do you mean treated like mixed kids and other new nationals?

I am not attacking you, I just know that how you look means a lot in this country.
Curtis you put commas on my being "Aussie " in Taiwan. But how can that be when I gave up my Aussie citizenship 16 years ago? Please explain to one and all.

I also had to get a visitor visa from ACIO in Taipei to visit Australia, just like other Taiwanese. You do know all foreigners need a visa to enter Australia right? No visa free entry to Australia at all.
April 6, 2014    cambridgeeng@
Father O'Connell's life-long mission is to save those people from social ignorance. He has never care who they are and WHERE it is. Since 1971 the whole world has purposely and faithfully neglected whatever called "Republic of China" (or ROC). Like Dr. MacKay, Father O'Connell will live forever in Taiwan history. He does not need a ROC citizenship.
April 7, 2014    curtisakbar@
The reason why I used the word ROC national and not citizen is based on the constitution of ROC, it doesn't refer to citizens but only nationals.

As for being treated the same, I don't doubt you feel like you are. My concern was raised by the fact that some would call you "foreigner" in the street and when you walk into a shop or restaurant you haven't been to before the workers will be in all a fuss until you open your mouth and speak Chinese.

The biggest difference between from birth ROC nationals and others, is the fact naturalized nationals can't run for public office.

swalker, why is it absurd to state the difference between ROC national and Taiwanese? It is based on race not nationality. Racially most Americans are Europeans but their nationality is American. Considering, there is no country called Taiwan only ROC, therefore his nationality is ROC.

BTW I am a believer in the creation of an independent Taiwan, with its own flags, anthem, symbols etc. celebrating the cultures of the island and not just the Chinese majority. Including everyone equally, regardless of race, religion and other characteristics but I know without the say so of China it will never happen.
April 8, 2014    asiaasiaasiaasia@
I really enjoyed reading this chain of comments. Good luck to the Commonwealth of Australia born Republic of China national/citizen. Well done on integrating so well. I live in a territory where one has to reside a minimum of 20 years before one is even eligible to apply for residency. And even then it's basically decided by a lottery. All the best there to everyone there in Asia's oldest republic.
April 10, 2014    jim@
Curtis again you are wrong. Naturalized citizens can run for public office. But they need to be citizens here for ten years before they can do so. Maybe you should check your facts before posting again because you are looking a bit ignorant of the facts.

Yes the main people who call me a foreigner are other western foreigners who have this idea that I can't call myself Taiwanese. They try and tell me I won’t be accepted here or I will always be treated like a foreigner, when I am not. I go to plenty of places I have never been to before and there is no "fuss" Last year I needed the land office to come to my property so I could mark out the boundaries. First time I had been there. The staff simply asked could I speak or read Chinese, asked me who I was and what relation to the ownership. I told them I am the registered head of household, showed them my title deeds, household registration etc. and paid the feed for an inspection.
No fuss. Yes I got asked how I became a citizen here but no one was surprised as they had dealt with other immigrants who had become citizens also.

It's natural for people to assume I wasn't born here but I have several Caucasian friends who were born here and do not have citizenship here. Except for Citizenship are they any less Taiwanese than other people born here?

Being Taiwanese is not based on race, although most are ethnically Asian. Would you say Curtis that immigrants who immigrate to USA Canada UK Europe Australia who becomes citizens of those countries not call themselves those nationalities? An immigrant to Australia can't call themselves Australian when they get their Australian Citizenship? Really Curtis as this is your argument.
April 10, 2014    swalker74@
"swalker, why is it absurd to state the difference between ROC national and Taiwanese?"

Because they are one and the same, that's why. Every Taiwanese is an ROC national and vice versa. Some very political locals may want to split hairs on the issue, but your particular distinction is nothing more than an absurdity and is not supported by common use or understanding of the respective terms.


"It is based on race not nationality. Racially most Americans are Europeans but their nationality is American. Considering, there is no country called Taiwan only ROC, therefore his nationality is ROC."

More indefensible nonsense. If you really want to distinguish between groups of locals, you'd need to identify them as benshengren, waishengren, Hakka, the numerous aboriginal tribes who exist here, as well as person whose heritages are mixtures of any of the above and/or others. At best "ROC national" is a formal way to refer to people with local citizenship and "Taiwanese" is simply informal.

You are ultimately trying to set up and defend an indefensible, race-based distinction that does not exist in law here. Sure, some people have issues with ethnic groups here. Ironically, you seem to be one of them. However, many do not.

Again I put to you: if someone feels comfortable living here as a local, having renounced and gained ROC nationality (Taiwanese, if you will), what's it to you? Why your need to dictate identity to these people and to make artificial distinctions?
April 14, 2014    curtisakbar@
'If you really want to distinguish between groups of locals, you'd need to identify them as benshengren, waishengren, Hakka', THESE ARE ALL CHINESE! They may have different ethnicity but racially they are all the same or very similar.

You seem to be pigeon holing me as someone who has an issue with different people, actually, I couldn't care who they are or where they come from as long as they are decent people.

By law there is no mention of being "Taiwanese" so where's your defensible position regarding this issue? Again, you miss my point and just ignore what I said or didn't understand. Racially, the Taiwanese are Aboriginals, but anyone can have ROC nationality. Just like, racially Germans are white but anyone can have Germany citizenship.

Yes, by law the ROC doesn't make distinctions between Taiwanese/ROC nationals, nor should it as there is no country called Taiwan! Just because most people call people in Taiwan, Taiwanese doesn't mean it is accurate. Most people call the Min language they speak here Taiwanese and the 'same' language is spoken in Fujian and is called Fujianese. So, just because most people think that way, doesn't mean it is right.

Yes, I'm glad that Jim doesn't face any problems here and is a happy camper. However, I was just stating things that I have experienced or witnessed happening to others. I have no vested interests in how other people live their lives, so if Jim is happy, Jim is happy, like I said in my last post.

I got tried of informing people that I was a "new resident" so when people call me a 'foreigner' I just reply and call them 'Chinese'. Childish yes, but at the end of the day, I should be able to go about my business without people heckling me in the street and then having to produce my ID to prove them wrong.
April 17, 2014    jim@
Funny you make mention of Taiwan. If you had a Taiwan passport it says TAIWAN across the front cover.

Taiwan's Gov put that on there so people would not confuse people from TAIWAN with people from China. And there is a distinction between nationals and citizens. Nationals do not have ID cards or ID numbers. Citizens do.

My son has a Taiwan passport but he has not citizenship here as he is not registered on any Hukou or household registration, not does he have an ID card. He also gets a 3 year visa to live in Taiwan in his Taiwan passport.
April 17, 2014    jim@
I hope Curtis never needs to visit the AIT.
http://www.ait.org.tw/en/home.html

U.S. Senior Official for APEC to Visit Taiwan April 17-21

He's not coming to visit the ROC. The country is Taiwan the government is ROC.

Next thing I know Curtis will be telling me English is language of places like America or Australia.
April 19, 2014    curtisakbar@
Jim

There is no such thing as a citizen of Taiwan. If you have a passport (don't need it just making a point) and ID card you are considered a national. If you don't have an ID card but you have a passport you are a national without registration, meaning no household documentation.

Yes, the passport does say "TAIWAN" at the bottom on the front cover, but at the top on the front cover it states "Republic of China". The Taiwan part was added by the DPP government during the time of rejecting everything about China, such as changing the name of the post office, overseas offices, airports and memorial halls. Taiwan is a part of the ROC just like Matsu, Green Island, Penghu etc.

"Next thing I know Curtis will be telling me English is language of places like America or Australia."

I have no idea what you meant, but I will have an educated guess. Australia and USA have no official language but English is the de facto. However, some states have made English the official language. Or, English is from England and other Anglophone countries speak the 'same' language but just a different variation.
April 20, 2014    cherriedottie@
I renounced to ROC citizenship 20 years ago because my late husband was an official. I understand each country should protect its own interests economically and politically. I do enjoy living here. Now that I am a widow and my grown up children soon will study abroad, I just found the complexity and the unfairness for naturalized citizens. My children can get dual nationalities in any country they wish, it's just the way this country protects its nationals for some reasons. But absolutely not me. I should choose one because I am naturalized. From any point of views I can feel the inferiority just like "a second class citizen" and the inefficiency in my life only to deal with the citizenship. The current law is outdated, it's the time for lawmaker to do a revision. For an old folk like me should be a consideration as a good citizen to this country just like the dear natural citizens. Also in the case of the American Priest, life is for the convenience but we have proven the good track records. Nobody will know about the future it doesn't mean that the priest not really love Taiwan , that he tries to keep his natural citizenship, somebody may have a strong bond with his countryside not mention for extended family matters like inheritance, property ownership, etc.
April 20, 2014    cherriedottie@
In the era of globalization it might be the right time for this country to give space by reevaluating the dual citizenship issue for naturalized citizens vs vice versa. It is about the transparency and fairness treatments in conjunction with the human nature and civil rights without putting aside the national interests and specific purposes.
April 23, 2014    jim@
Cherie thanks for your post. I so support a change to the law but don't see it happening any time soon.

PS As a naturalized ROC Citizen I was also able to obtain dual nationality 15 years later on due to a change in laws of the country I came from. This change occurred in 2007 where previous citizens who renounced or lost their citizenship because they became citizens of other countries were allowed to resume citizenship. I did this in 2013 for a passport of convenience. This is because I do business in the Philippines and a Taiwan passport holder requires a visa which costs NT$1000 and I make several trips a year.

An Australian passport issued by ACIO in Taipei costs NT$6,000. So the only time I use the Australian passport is for entry to Philippines or Australia. I did it for cost benefits not because I will ever return to Australia to live. When I renounced it didn't make any difference because Australia did not recognize dual nationality at that time. Law changed in Australia in April 2002 to allow Australians to have dual nationality.
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