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Air Force pilot safe after F-16 crashes off Southern Taiwan

TAIPEI--An Air Force single-seater F-16 jet fighter crashed into waters southwest of Chiayi in Southern Taiwan on Wednesday, but its pilot ejected to safety, according to Air Force Command Headquarters.

The plane crashed soon after taking off from the Air Force's base in Chiayi at 2 p.m. on a training mission, the headquarters said.

The pilot, Lieutenant Wu Yen-ting, found there was something wrong with the plane and ejected after reporting the problem to the control tower, according to the Air Force.

An S-70C helicopter was then sent to rescue the 26-year-old pilot, who suffered only minor injuries. Wu is now being treated at a veterans hospital in Chiayi, the headquarters said.

The Air Force suspected mechanical failure was behind the crash but said it has set up a special task force to further investigate the cause of the mishap.

May 16, 2013    roberto_garces@
Are they gonna blame the Philippines for the crash?
May 16, 2013    carlos.segovia33@
roberto_garces@ wrote:
Are they gonna blame the Philippines for the crash?
NO. They will blame it on the wrong timing karma, as Amadeo Perez was arriving in Taiwan at about the same time, but being refused meeting with Taiwan’s Foreign Minister.
May 17, 2013    citizenresponsible829@
roberto_garces@ wrote:
Are they gonna blame the Philippines for the crash?
Taiwan’s F16 went down even before the Philippine Air force fired a single shot. This is what we called Divine justice for the maltreatment of Taiwan against the OFWs who have nothing to do with the incident.
May 17, 2013    george_patton1@
Cost of crashed F-16 is approx $14.6M dollars, more than enough to compensate their fisherman. What a big loss from Taiwan government for their stupidity in showing force.
May 17, 2013    borishereyuri@
hope he's OK... -Pinoys
May 18, 2013    richchen35@
roberto_garces@ wrote:
Are they gonna blame the Philippines for the crash?
Stop posting negative remarks or else we will resort to something that will make your Filipino OFW regret why they came here in the first place.
May 20, 2013    peejay_202@
^^ That only shows how arrogant Taiwanese people are. Don't blame the Philippines, blame your Government for not monitoring and reprimanding your fishermen from poaching inside other countries' territorial waters.
May 21, 2013    gazette@
It's the second time the Philippine Navy or Coastguard open fired at an unarmed fishing vessel. And both times, people died. And the culprits were never persecuted successfully though the evidence were damning. Taiwanese people are not arrogant. We just want due process and due justice. And those reports that Filipino OCWs in Taiwan have been denied basic services or hurt, I'm sure if there are proper evidences presented, those people who caused this will be reprimanded or prosecuted to the full extend of the law. But first things first, the Philippine government needs to fully cooperate on jointly investigating this shooting incident. It doesn't matter if the Philippines doesn't recognize Taiwan. I'm sure China is looking closely at the developments as well and will not hinder any Philippine - Taiwan cooperation to fix this problem.
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A rescuer and an Air Force pilot are lifted to a helicopter in a rescue mission off Chiayi, Southern Taiwan, yesterday. The pilot, who bailed out from his F-16 (like those pictured top right) before the jet fighter crashed, is said to be in a fair condition. (CNA)

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