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DPP candidates for Taipei mayoral bid make final appeals

TAIPEI--Two Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) aspirants for the party's nomination in the year-end Taipei mayoral election made their final pushes on Sunday ahead of Tuesday's poll that will determine who advances to a second stage in the primary.

Lawyer Wellington Koo and Legislator Yao Wen-chih visited traditional markets and appealed for support by handing out fresh carnations, the flower commonly used to mark Mother's Day in Taiwan, and lollipops.

Koo and Yao will be joined by lawmaker Hsu Tain-tsair in the three-way poll on May 13.

Another potential candidate, former Vice President Annette Lu, announced on Saturday that she was pulling out of the poll because she disapproved of how the DPP was tailoring its primary to accommodate non-party members.

The party's primary is being held in two stages.

After the internal poll of DPP candidates is held on May 13, the winner will then face off against independent candidates in another poll in June to determine who will represent the pan-green camp.

The arrangement has been made to include National Taiwan University physician Ko Wen-je in the process.

Polls suggest that Ko, an independent whose views dovetail with those of the DPP, is seen as the pan-green camp's best chance of beating the pan-blue Kuomintang (KMT) nominee Sean Lien in a city viewed as a KMT stronghold.

But Ko resisted becoming a DPP member, making him ineligible to participate in the DPP primary. That left the party with the dilemma of whether to field its own candidate in the Taipei race or find a way to unite behind Ko's bid.

The two-stage primary was how it decided to solve the dilemma, leaving Lu upset.

May 13, 2014    ntcmtlpeterlee@
An elected lawmaker is supposed to work for the people who voted for him. In fact, the party is also supposed to work for the people. So, the final winner of the final poll will very likely be eventually elected by the people, no matter if he (or she) is a party recommended (or supported) candidate.
May 13, 2014    normanytlim@
ntcmtlpeterlee@ wrote:
An elected lawmaker is supposed to work for the people who voted for him. In fact, the party is also supposed to work for the people. So, the final winner of the final poll will very likely be eventually elected by the people, no matter if he (or she) is a party recommended (or supported) candidate.
I agree with what you say. The elected candidate is duty-bound to serve the people to the best of his or her ability, whether or not he or she represents any political party or as an independent.

But the question now is Ko Wen-je hasn't voiced his stand nor his policies on the governing of Taipei City and he is likely to capitalize on the pan-green supporters. I am not from any party nor do I incline in any direction, but Ko's situation now is definitely going to benefit the KMT, if he were to remain as he is now.
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