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Wang, Zhang discuss possible Ma-Xi meet

TAIPEI, Taiwan -- Mainland Affairs Council Minister Wang Yu-chi (王郁琦) yesterday met his mainland Chinese counterpart, TAO Director Zhang Zhijun (張志軍), for the second time during his four-day visit in mainland China, with reports indicating that the two discussed a possible meeting between President Ma Ying-jeou and Chinese Communist Party General Secretary Xi Jinping.

The event was not open to reporters, and neither Wang nor Zhang made any public statements prior to the meeting, which began at roughly 8 p.m.

The minister yesterday traveled to Shanghai and met with members of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, a think tank based in the mainland Chinese port city.

The forum lasted roughly two hours, after which Wang told reporters that he had taken part in the forum not only to learn more about mainland China's policies, but also to urge mainland Chinese scholars to help influence the TAO.

The deputy head of the academy reportedly referred to Wang as “chief executive of the Mainland Affairs Council in the Taiwan region” as opposed to using Wang's formal title. When asked by reporters, Wang said that he was referred to as “minister” throughout the meeting. The minister added, however, that it may take some time for some people in mainland China to get accustomed to using his formal title, something which he feels is understandable given the circumstances.

Restrictions Against Taiwan Web Content

The minister yesterday also visited Radio and Television Shanghai and called on the mainland Chinese authorities to lift their restrictions against Taiwanese Web-based content.

Taiwan has a lot of good audio and visual content, including films, popular music and television programs, Wang said, adding that he would like to see a larger mainland Chinese audience tune in to Taiwanese programs.

Allowing more Taiwanese visual and audio content into the mainland Chinese market would be a good starting point to greater cross-strait cultural exchange, the minister said.

People in Taiwan can browse mainland Chinese websites without any problems, but people in mainland China may not be able to see a lot of online content from Taiwan, Wang said.

Hopefully, people in mainland China will be given the opportunity to access Taiwanese Web-based content more easily, the minister said.

Wang added that he has learnt more about the development of mainland China's communications industry during his visit in Shanghai.

February 15, 2014    viaboston@
This is so humiliating for Taiwan, how do they keep being humiliated in silence the way they are treated with such disdain and disrespect by China. I just have to laugh to at the whole idea of Taiwan asking China to lift internet restrictions, if the KMT and the descendants of the colonizers from China have their way and somehow Taiwan becomes part of the China, no more Facebook or free internet or free speech for the Taiwanese, let alone giving up your national identity, sheesh, so sad for Taiwanese...
February 15, 2014    LEGERWECK@
The words this particular article and many others use to identify China is "mainland China", or on some occasions "the mainland". At first I thought it was because Hong Kong is an island, but the China Post typically refers to Hong Kong as Hong Kong, even though it is controlled by China. Why is this?
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Cars drive past the Fairmont Peace Hotel in Shanghai. The hotel was selected for the second meeting between Mainland Affairs Council Minister Wang Yu-chi (王郁琦) and his mainland Chinese counterpart, Taiwan Affairs Office Director Zhang Zhijun (張志軍). (CNA)

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