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Chang Gung's mass resignation case has gotten even more mysterious

The circumstances of a mass exodus of doctors from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital became even murkier Friday, when one of its casualties held a press conference to tell his side of the story.

Forty-one Chang Gung doctors tendered their resignations a few weeks ago, ostensibly because two managerial-level employees were removed for "violating hospital regulations."

Shortly afterward, the hospital released a statement that said the two managerial-level employees had not violated regulations after all — and that two different staff members would be removed from their positions over the error.

One of those two staff members was Chang Gung Medical Foundation Steering Committee chief Shih-tseng Lee (李石增), who spoke to reporters for the first time today since his fall from grace.

Here are some of the highlights of his press conference, which gave a few answers but raised more questions.

The resignation incident began with a report, and the report said the emergency room was bad at scheduling

At the press conference, Lee said it all began after the release of a report about the management of the Chang Gung hospital system. One of the report's many findings was that there were problems with the allocation of emergency staff.

"Some worked 60 hours in the emergency clinic while some worked 0," he said.

"And during the busiest time, namely 4 p.m. to 12 a.m., there were comparatively few staff. Whereas from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., there was an ample supply of personnel but few patients."

Finally! This is what everyone meant by "violating hospital regulations."

Citing an "irregular flow of receipts," the report said that two managerial-level employees may have withdrawn money from a donations fund and siphoned it into their personal coffers through a critical care foundation, Lee said. According to him, Chang Gung had asked the two employees to provide a detailed report on the contents of an account but the two had staunchly refused.

Lee said he did nothing wrong.

At the press conference, Lee said he had been unfairly blamed for the mass resignation of the physicians. He said he had asked for a decision on the two suspected staff members to be delayed, but that Diana Wang (王瑞慧), head of the hospital's board of directors, had ordered him to "deal with the case quickly" and to immediately remove the pair.

When their removal fomented a media scandal, Wang tried to protect herself by scapegoating him. "I have been made into a sacrificial lamb!" he said.

Someone threatened his family?

In the Q&A section of the event, Lee took a dark turn and insinuated that someone or some group had threatened his family in the aftermath of his forced resignation.

Responding directly to a reporter's question, he confirmed that he had in fact posted to Facebook a declaration that he had no intention of committing suicide.

He said mysteriously, "Some actions from various sources had appeared that affected my family members, influenced them, and so I could not stay silent — and that's why I published the statement. As for what actions caused them to feel threatened, I will not enumerate them here."

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