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Napier brings it home for UConn

ARLINGTON, Texas — Shabazz Napier walked slowly through the hallway of the stadium — the tears still drying, the twine from the cut-down net still hanging around his neck.

"Bittersweet. Bittersweet. Bittersweet," he said, over and over again.

Bitter because it's over. Sweet because UConn won it all after being left behind and told to go away.

Napier turned in one final masterpiece as a college player Monday night, lifting the Huskies to a 60-54 win over Kentucky's freshmen and bringing home a championship hardly anyone not wearing a UConn uniform thought was possible.

"It's unbelievable because those guys, my players, stayed with the program," coach Kevin Ollie said.

Led by 22 points from Napier, 14 points from Ryan Boatright and strong defensive games from both, the Huskies (32-8) won it all a short year after they were barred from March Madness because of academic problems. That triggered the departure of five players, and coach Jim Calhoun left because of health concerns.

For those who remained, it stoked a fire no one could put out.

"You're looking at the hungry Huskies," Napier told the crowd and TV audience as confetti rained down. "Ladies and gentlemen, this is what happens when you banned us."

UConn never trailed in the final. The Huskies led by as many as 15 in the first half and watched the Wildcats (29-11) trim the deficit to one with 8:13 left. But Aaron Harrison, who pulled out wins with clutch 3-pointers in Kentucky's last three games, missed a 3 from the left corner that would've given the Cats the lead. Kentucky never got that close again.

One key difference in a six-point loss: Kentucky's 11 missed free throws — a flashback of sorts for coach John Calipari, whose Memphis team blew a late lead against Kansas after missing multiple free throws in the 2008 final. The Wildcats went 13 for 24. UConn went 10 for 10, including Lasan Kromah's two to seal the game with 25.1 seconds left.

Calipari said he decided not to foul at the end "because they're not missing."

"These kids aren't machines. They're not robots. They're not computers," Calipari said. "I say it again: I wish I had an answer for them later in the game where I could have done something to just click it to where we needed it to go. That 3 in the corner, if that would have gone, maybe the game changes a little bit, but it didn't."

In all, Calipari's One and Doners got outdone by a more fundamentally sound, more-seasoned group that came into this tournament a seventh-seeded afterthought but walked away with the program's fourth national title since 1999. They are the highest seed to win it all since Rollie Massimino's eighth-seeded Villanova squad in 1985.

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Connecticut guard Shabazz Napier shoots between Kentucky guard Dominique Hawkins (25) and guard Aaron Harrison (2) during the first half of the NCAA Final Four tournament college basketball championship game Monday, April 7, in Arlington, Texas.

(AP)

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