International Edition

Thursday

December, 8, 2016

Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.
About Us
Subscribe
Advertise
Contact Us

Trump looms large at Gotham Awards

NEW YORK -- At a Gotham Independent Film Awards overshadowed by the election of Donald Trump, Barry Jenkins' coming-of-age drama "Moonlight" shined brightest.

A celebrated film about a boy growing up gay, black and poor in Miami, "Moonlight," virtually swept the night, taking best feature, best screenplay, a special jury award for best ensemble and the audience award. The Gothams, which honor independent film, are essentially the kick-off to Hollywood's long awards season.

Monday night's ceremony, hosted in Manhattan by Keegan-Michael Key, also served as the first opportunity for the film industry — or at least a sizable chunk of its more East Coast, indie contingent — to formally gather since the election. It gave much of Hollywood (which overwhelmingly backed Hillary Clinton) a chance to commiserate over drinks, try out punchlines and make a rallying cry for art's political power.

Key, half of the former Comedy Central duo "Key and Peele," opened, with deadpan sarcasm, with what he said was a four-week-old monologue.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we are so grateful that we live in a country that celebrates diversity," said Key. Later, he gave up the guise and spoke earnestly. "Our voices need to be heard now," he said.

It was fitting then that "Moonlight" dominated the evening. The string of awards had the cast — which features newcomers Trevante Rhodes, Ashton Sanders and Alex R. Hibbert playing the young protagonist in three chapters — frequently dancing arm-in-arm while the Gotham crowd stood to applaud.

Though "Moonlight," based on Tarell Alvin McCraney's play, has some big-name backers (Brad Pitt's Plan B produced it), Jenkins played the role of the underdog.

"When I made this film, I thought five people would watch it," Jenkins said. In limited release, the low-budged "Moonlight" has already made US$8.5 million, making it one of the year's biggest indie hits.

Other top awards went to Casey Affleck, who won best actor for his performance in Kenneth Lonergan's "Manchester by the Sea," and Isabelle Huppert, whose turn in Paul Verhoeven's "Elle" took best actress over favorites such as Natalie Portman ("Jackie") and Annette Bening ("20th Century Women"). The French actress, visibly shocked, said she had been told the Gothams were very American in outlook, and so her chances were slim.

"I feel so American tonight," chuckled Huppert. "I feel good. I feel really good."

Others sounded less enthused about their country and the president-elect who resides about 70 blocks to the north of Monday's awards. Oliver Stone, one of the night's four tribute honorees (the others were Amy Adams, Ethan Hawke and producer Arnon Milchan), gave a relatively muted speech, but told filmmakers in attendance: "You can be critical of your government. We've forgotten that."

Write a Comment
CAPTCHA Code Image
Type in image code
Change the code
 Receive our promos
 Respond to this email
MOST POPULAR
Subscribe  |   Advertise  |   RSS Feed  |   About Us  |   Career  |   Contact Us
Sitemap  |   Top Stories  |   Taiwan  |   China  |   Business  |   Asia  |   World  |   Sports  |   Life  |   Arts & Leisure  |   Health  |   Editorial  |   Commentary
Travel  |   Movies  |   TV Listings  |   Classifieds  |   Bookstore  |   Getting Around  |   Weather  |   Guide Post  |   Student Post  |   Terms of Use  |   Sitemap
  chinapost search