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New Mexico nuclear waste dump under fire

ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico--Federal investigators have uncovered a series of shortcomings in safety training, emergency response and oversight at a troubled New Mexico nuclear waste dump where a truck caught fire and 17 workers were recently contaminated by a radiation leak.

A report released Friday on the investigation into the first of back-to-back accidents at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad says a Feb. 5 truck blaze apparently was ignited by a buildup of oil and other combustible materials that should have been regularly cleaned off the vehicle. The truck also was operating without an automatic fire suppression system, the Department of Energy report said. And one of several mistakes made in the chaotic moments that followed switched the filtration systems in the mine a half-mile (800 meters) underground and sent smoke billowing into areas where workers expected to have “good air.”

The report also identified problems with safety culture at the federal government's only permanent repository for waste from the nation's nuclear bomb-building facilities, and it said a series of repeat deficiencies identified by an independent oversight board had gone unresolved.

New Mexico Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich called the report “deeply concerning.”

“Fortunately, no one was hurt,” the Democrats said in a joint statement. “The community of Carlsbad and the nation expect WIPP to operate with the highest level of safety. The board has identified a number of serious safety concerns that will need to be fully addressed. We believe all levels of management at the Department of Energy and at WIPP must take the recommendations from the board very seriously and fully implement them.”

Rep. Steve Pearce, a Republican whose district includes the plant, applauded the DOE for a transparent report that highlights “the sloppy procedures that caused the fire.”

An investigation of a radiation release nine days later that contaminated 17 workers and sent toxic particles into the air around the plant is expected to be complete in a few weeks. At this point, officials say they are unsure if the fire and the radiation release are related. The mine has been shuttered since the Feb. 14 release, but investigators hope to be able to get below next week to see what happened.

The accidents are the first major incidents at the repository, which began taking radioactive waste 15 years ago.

Just hours before the report on the truck fire was previewed at a community meeting Thursday evening, the contractor that runs the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant demoted the facility's president.

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In this March 7 photo released by the U.S. Department of Energy, specially-trained workers make unmanned tests inside a nuclear waste dump in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

(AP)

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