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Boko Haram abducts 60 women and girls

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria--Suspected Boko Haram militants have abducted more than 60 women and girls, some as young as three, in the latest kidnappings in northeast Nigeria and over two months since more than 200 schoolgirls were seized.

Analysts said the kidnapping, which happened during a raid late Monday on Kummabza village in the Damboa district of Borno state, could be an attempt by the Islamist group to refocus attention on its demands for the release of militant fighters.

Boko Haram has indicated that it would be willing to release the 219 schoolgirls that it has held hostage since April 14 in exchange for the freedom of its brothers in arms currently held in Nigerian jails.

Nigeria initially refused to sanction any deal, but efforts have since been made to open talks with the group, with a possible prisoner swap part of discussions.

The military in Abuja said in a tweet late on Monday it could not confirm the latest abductions, and spokesmen were not immediately available for comment when contacted by AFP on Tuesday.

Borno senator Ali Ndume confirmed the latest abductions, and said Boko Haram “took advantage” as people returned to the area to check on their farms during flooding when there was no military presence in the area.

“Boko Haram selected young males and females” as hostages, and “left the elderly,” he said, amid local media reports that some 30 young boys may have also been taken.

A senior officer in the Damboa local government said: “Over 60 women were hijacked and forcefully taken away by the terrorists.

“The village was also destroyed,” he said, adding that “among those abducted are children between the ages of three and 12.”

'Shot dead'

Aji Khalil, a local vigilante leader, said: “Over 60 women were abducted by Boko Haram terrorists. They were forcefully taken away by Boko Haram terrorists.

“Four villagers who tried to escape were shot dead on the spot.”

Damboa local government officials said they were afraid to speak out because of the controversy surrounding the Chibok abductions, with Nigeria's government coming under heavy criticism for its slow response.

News of the abductions came as locals in three villages of the Askira Uba district, some 60 kilometers to the south, said they had been attacked over the weekend.

Resident Emos Ali said “many” people had died, although no official toll was available.

A bomb blast blamed on Boko Haram killed at least eight at a public health college in the northern city of Kano on Monday.

The newly appointed religious leader the Emir of Kano, former central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, said the attack had “traumatized every one of us” after visiting the wounded in hospital.

“We pray to Allah to bring an end to this security situation and may Allah not allow a repeat of this,” he said in his first comments on Boko Haram violence since his appointment.

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In this Monday, May 19 photo, Martha Mark, the mother of kidnapped school girl Monica Mark, cries as she displays her child's photo in the family's house, in Chibok, Nigeria.

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