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Some studies have suggested that diet soda lovers could face higher risks of diabetes and heart disease, but one recent U.S. study of several diet drink consumers found that overall eating habits may be what matters most in the end.
Health researchers said on Thursday they had found a troubling link between higher consumption of rice and Type 2 diabetes, a disease that in some countries is becoming an epidemic.
Eating a portion of processed red meat daily can boost a person's risk of dying young by up to 20 percent, said a long-running U.S. study of more than 120,000 people released on Monday.
It's a dream of medical science that looks tantalizingly within reach: the artificial pancreas, a potential breakthrough treatment for the scourge of type 1 diabetes.
The International Diabetes Federation predicts that one in 10 adults could have diabetes by 2030, according to their latest statistics.
U.S. vaccine advisers on Tuesday voted to recommend routine vaccination for Hepatitis B for adults with diabetes under the age of 60 and said people older than 60 "may" get the vaccine as well.
It's festival season in India, with the celebrations providing a perfect opportunity for family outings, late-night parties and customary feasting on sweets.
Strict lowering of blood sugar in older diabetics preserved some of their brain volume, but it did nothing to slow memory loss, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.
An estimated 366 million people worldwide now suffer from diabetes and the global epidemic is getting worse, health officials said Tuesday.
Diet soda and other artificially-sweetened drinks, previously implicated in the chance of developing diabetes, are not guilty, according to a study by researchers at Harvard University.
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