Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.
More Health Topics
  Aging    AIDS    Arthritis/Pains    
  Cancer    Children’s Health    Cold & Flu    
  Diabetes    Eye Health    Genetics    Heart    
  Hypertension    Infectious Diseases    
  Medicine    Mental Health    
  Nutrition & Fitness     Oral Hygiene     
  Sexual Health     Skin & Beauty     
  Pregnancy & Menopause    Stroke    
  Surgical News    Other    
Deadlocked over the risks of long-acting asthma drugs, U.S. government health officials Wednesday asked outside advisers if four medications used by millions of patients should remain on the market.
In recent years, millions of asthma patients have started using long-acting drugs to help them breathe more normally, allowing for nights of uninterrupted sleep or workouts at the gym.
The blockbuster asthma drug Advair does not appear to have an increased risk of serious respiratory complications seen with similar new medicines, U.S. government health officials said Friday.
Asthma inhalers go "green" in the United States on Dec. 31, which will force patients still using the old-fashioned kind to make a pricey and even confusing switch.
Babies born by Caesarean section are more likely to develop asthma than children delivered naturally, Swiss researchers said on Tuesday.
A usually harmless childhood virus may hide in the lungs and come back to cause wheezing and other symptoms of asthma, U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday.
Asthmatic children should always have an emergency plan with them containing instructions on what to do if they have an asthma attack, according to the Heidenheim-based German Pneumologists Association (BdP).
Patients with an allergy to metal, often first revealed when wearing certain jewelry, are also at risk for reactions to implanted medical devices made of metal, such as pacemakers and orthopedic prostheses.
Active people who are prone to sweating may have some built-in protection from exercise-induced asthma attacks, a new study suggests.
With careful monitoring, even children who have had allergic reactions to a vaccine can still be vaccinated, a U.S. team of experts said on Tuesday.
Sitemap | Top Stories | Taiwan | China | Business | Asia | World | Sports | Life | Arts & Leisure | Health | Editorial | Commentary | Travel | Movies | TV Listings
Classifieds | Bookstore | Getting Around | Weather | Guide Post | Student Post | Subscribe | Advertise | About Us | Career | Contact Us
Copyright © 1999 – 2015 The China Post. Breaking news from Taiwan, China and the world.
The China Post  Terms of use