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December, 29, 2016

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HISTORIC HEALING
AP

PEARL HARBOR -- The leaders of Japan and the United States sought to remind the world that even the most bitter enemies can become allies, during a historic pilgrimage to the hallowed waters of Pearl Harbor.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe did not apologize, but conceded Japan "must never repeat the horrors of war again."

Seventy-five years after Japan's surprise attack, Abe and President Barack Obama peered down Tuesday at the rusting wreckage of the USS Arizona, clearly visible in the tranquil, teal water. In a show of respect for the war dead, Obama and Abe dropped purple petals into the water and stood in silence.

More than 1,000 U.S. war dead remain entombed in the submerged ship, which Japan struck as part of the devastating attack that killed more than 2,300 Americans and sent America marching into World War II.

"As the prime minister of Japan, I offer my sincere and everlasting condolences to the souls of those who lost their lives here, as well as to the spirits of all the brave men and women whose lives were taken by a war that commenced in this very place," Abe said later at nearby Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

That was the closest Abe would get to an apology for the attack. And it was enough for Obama, who also declined to apologize seven months ago when he became America's first sitting president to visit Hiroshima, where the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb in a bid to end the war.

It was enough, too, for Alfred Rodrigues, a U.S. Navy veteran who survived the attack. The 96-year-old said he had no hard feelings and added, "War is war."

"They were doing what they were supposed to do, and we were doing what we were supposed to do," Rodrigues said before the visit.

In the years after Pearl Harbor, the U.S. incarcerated roughly 120,000 Japanese-Americans in internment camps before dropping atomic bombs in 1945 that killed some 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 70,000 in Nagasaki.

Since the war, the U.S. and Japan have built a powerful alliance that both sides say has grown during Obama's tenure, including strengthened military ties. Yet there are questions about whether the relationship will fray under President-elect Donald Trump, a possibility neither Obama nor Abe addressed.

Abe, who became Japan's first leader to visit Pearl Harbor with a U.S. president, said the visit "brought utter silence to me." His remarks capped a day that was carefully choreographed by the U.S. and Japan to show a strong and growing alliance between former foes.

Japanese officials said that in their talks, Abe and Obama agreed to closely monitor the movements of China's first and sole aircraft carrier, which has sailed into the western Pacific for the first time.

To be continued with www.chinapost.com.tw


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Opinions
Consensus still needed on same-sex marriage bill
The China Post News Staff

President Tsai Ing-wen on Monday called for a meeting between civic groups in favor of and against same-sex marriage, hoping to maintain rationality in dealing with the controversial bill. Opponents had gathered outside the Legislature earlier that day, as lawmakers screened an amendment to the Civil Code that would give same-sex couples the same rights as their heterosexual counterparts. The move, however, drew the ire of several civic groups and religious organizations that vowed to fight the bill to the end — which they have every right to do. As the bill cannot be dealt with in the current legislative session though, we would like to encourage the president to push for further dialogue between opponents and supporters of the bill ahead of the opening of the next legislative session in February. At the same time, we hope the ruling and opposition parties can engage in cross-party consultations to help build consensus on this important legislation.

To be continued with www.chinapost.com.tw


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Entertainment
96-year-old Taylor Swift fan gets a Christmas surprise
By Jim Salter, AP

ST. LOUIS -- At age 96, Cyrus Porter is a devoted Taylor Swift fan. He's traveled from his rural Missouri home to St. Louis and Memphis, Tennessee, to see her in concert.

On Monday, in the midst of a thunderstorm, the concert came to the World War II combat veteran, a surprise visit from the singer and her parents.

He had hosted 72 people for a family Christmas a day earlier. Many of his relatives were still there when a van pulled into the driveway of his home in New Madrid, about 130 miles south of St. Louis.

"My daughter opened the door and said, 'It's Taylor Swift!'" Porter told The Associated Press on Tuesday. "I couldn't believe it. It's not a miracle but I'd say it's pretty close."

Swift spent about an hour talking with Porter and family. Then, on the enclosed back porch, she sang her 2014 No. 1 hit, "Shake It Off," with dozens of Porter's relatives joining in.

"The whole family was singing along on the back porch," Porter said. "I though the police might come by!"

Porter likes his classic country, but he has been a fan of the 27-year-old singer ever since she burst onto the music scene as a teenager.

"The way she puts on a show is what I like," he said.

It wasn't clear how Swift came to find out about Porter's fandom, but he said that he was "proud of her to take the time out to do something like that for an old country boy."

To be continued with www.chinapost.com.tw


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Bilingual News
資誠示警:家族企業健全接班制度 台灣僅9%
鉅亨網記者宋宜芳, The China Post news staff

台北 -- 資誠會計事務所昨 (27) 日公布 2016 資誠家族企業調查報告指出,台灣僅 9% 的家族企業有健全的接班計畫,明顯偏低。資誠聯合會計師事務所家族企業調查負責人郭銘宗直言,接班流程規劃執行不佳,不僅讓世代交替成了營運管理階層的斷層,也成為家族企業明顯潛在的失敗因素。

資誠最新調查顯示,家族企業正在持續建立家族專業化的流程,包括一些機制,像是股東協議、家族議會、接班人不適任的退場機制。其中,引進外部專業經理人,也是另一個專業的方式,從基本層面看來,更好的流程、更清楚的角色、責任分工,讓高階主管團隊得以騰出時間和空間進行策略規劃跟思考。

但家族企業領袖,對下一代接班人跟專業經理人的分野,在於能否將企業視為自己的第二生命,有企業家認為,當企業經營與個人生涯規劃、利益產生衝突,二代接班人能否義無反顧選擇企業經營,才能決定是否能成為一個適切接班人的因素。

只是專業經理人也是有難題待解決,因為家族不見得願意放棄掌控權,也因此當家族、企業主基於情緒而非理性的決策,凌駕外部執行長的專業判斷,這也讓專業經理人不見得真的能有所發揮。

資誠全球家族企業調查報告顯示,許多家族企業的重要決定都是在餐桌上談成的,外部執行長理所當然的被隔絕在策略決策過程中的參與。

台灣家族企業如何穩健走向百年,資誠會計事務所提出,家族企業必須加倍努力以有效處理接班議題,並且制定健全計畫。

To be continued with www.chinapost.com.tw


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