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Ma is a lame horse, should step down as head of KMT

King Charles III, a new comedy drama about the future of the English monarchy, is running at the Almeida Theatre in London until May 31. The stage play takes the form of a Shakespearean history play and uses it to imagine the difficult early days after Prince Charles finally becomes king. Charles wants to reassert the role of the monarchy with disastrous results. There's talk of his abdication in favor of his son William.

The drama is playing to an SRO audience — so popular that tongues are wagging in Taipei over the possibility of Ma Ying-jeou, the lame duck turned lame horse president, abdicating in favor of Vice President Wu Den-yih. Well, it's a little too far-fetched to compare Charles to Wu, the only similarity being that both Wu and William happen to be heirs apparent.

Of course, if King Charles III tries to reassert the role of the monarchy, he will suffer disastrous results President Ma has been tallying of late. King Charles I of the House of Stuart asserted the role of the monarchy too aggressively to survive. Oliver Cromwell and his Parliament army revolted and had him tried, convicted and executed for high treason in January 1649. Charles III certainly won't repeat the mistakes of his remote Stuart ancestor. Neither is Ma considered a tyrannical ruler like the hanged king of England, Scotland and Ireland.

But President Ma has failed to address public grievances from the past as well as the new to such an extent that people regard themselves as casualties of socio-economic hardships and lack of governance and development. Such discontent has found freedom to organize and demonstrate against his governance.

The seething public discontent boiled over in the massive public support for the Sunflower Movement calling on Ma to retract the Cross-Strait Trade in Services Agreement and for Lin Yi-hsiung's hunger strike to scrap Nuke 4. And the Democratic Progressive Party is able to take advantage of the two protest movements in tandem to further polarize Taiwan in an all-out effort to win the nationwide local elections, commonly known as the seven-in-one election, on Nov. 29 this year and the presidential race in 2016.

Taiwan has become unrulable.

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