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March 30, 2017

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Editorial > World Issues
Some nations believe themselves to be great. Some vow to be great again. Some have the word great in their name. But the greatness of a nation does not stem merely from its economic clout, its military might and its technological advancement.
 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is in trouble. He donated 1 million yen (US$9,000) through his wife Akie to a school run by ultranationalist educators in Osaka, and a possible land-buying scandal with political influence has emerged.
 
In an age when most people in developed countries own a smartphone and workers are worried of being made redundant by artificial intelligence, it is easy to forget how provincial human society can sometimes be.
 
Journalism is based on the principle of providing facts and educated analysis to the readers in order to help them understand the world and to make choices. In the post-fact world, however, it is clear that facts alone are not enough.
 
With U.S. President Donald Trump accusing his predecessor Barack Obama of wiretapping his campaign last year without providing any evidence, the issue of big, unverified accusations is again being discussed.
 
In support of truth
In normal times, the truth does not need any support. It is self-evident and universal. These are, however, not normal times.
 
The Oscars, Hollywood's biggest night, are today. While the academy has stepped up its game on diversity this year, it still seems to view it as purely a black-and-white matter.
 
Two major court cases in Hong Kong over the past week have confirmed that the Chinese special administrative zone and former British colony is no longer the city that many of us knew. And it is changing for the worse.
 
U.S. President Donald Trump made an about-face demarche last Thursday as we had predicted on this page many a time long before his inauguration.
 
In less than a month, the White House under U.S. President Donald Trump has managed to get into arguments with American mainstream media, members of the opposition party and his own party, world leaders such as the prime minister of Australia, a U.S. federal court, a number of U.S. top companies, Meryl Streep and pretty much anyone who disagrees with him.
 
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