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Tsai faces growing pressure to pardon ex-President Chen
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Taipei mayor refuses to meet new police chief forced upon him
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Executive Yuan spokesman offers to apologize for premier's AIDS comment
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Rohingya in India are illegal immigrants, not refugees, minister says
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The rise of 'New Zealand's Justin Trudeau'
Editorial
This past Saturday marked Earth Day, the annual worldwide day where more than one billion people across the world celebrate by showing support for environmental protection. But in 2017, things are complicated.
 
The United States seemed set for isolationism when President Donald Trump took office in January, with the world on its toes guessing to what extent his campaign promises would materialize.
 
Pepsi recently pulled a just-released ad after receiving heavy flak from millennials, its target audience.
 
The U.S. missile strike in Syria in response to the Syrian government's alleged use of chemical weapons on Thursday was an example of the volatile and unpredictable decision making processes in Washington under President Donald Trump.
 
Some nations believe themselves to be great. Some vow to be great again. Some have the word great in their name. But the greatness of a nation does not stem merely from its economic clout, its military might and its technological advancement.
 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is in trouble. He donated 1 million yen (US$9,000) through his wife Akie to a school run by ultranationalist educators in Osaka, and a possible land-buying scandal with political influence has emerged.
 
In an age when most people in developed countries own a smartphone and workers are worried of being made redundant by artificial intelligence, it is easy to forget how provincial human society can sometimes be.
 
Journalism is based on the principle of providing facts and educated analysis to the readers in order to help them understand the world and to make choices. In the post-fact world, however, it is clear that facts alone are not enough.
 
With U.S. President Donald Trump accusing his predecessor Barack Obama of wiretapping his campaign last year without providing any evidence, the issue of big, unverified accusations is again being discussed.
 
In support of truth
In normal times, the truth does not need any support. It is self-evident and universal. These are, however, not normal times.
 
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