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Editorial
Media workers and undertakers will remain covered by standard labor protections for the meantime, while those who make the tests for university and civil service exams will soon be classified as exempt, the Ministry of Labor decided Wednesday.
 
The Judicial Reform National Conference organized by the Presidential Office made suggestions on Monday to drastically cut the number of Supreme Court and Supreme Administrative Court judges from 94 to 21, as well as to give the president the final say over judicial appointments.
 
It seems that every generation has a tendency to focus on its own struggles while downplaying the plight of other generations.
 
This past Saturday marked Earth Day, the annual worldwide day where more than one billion people across the world celebrate by showing support for environmental protection. But in 2017, things are complicated.
 
The government's recent introduction of a bill that would relax restrictions for foreign workers and foreigners seeking jobs in Taiwan is welcome. The nation has a graying population and a need to increase its exposure to the global community. Opening our doors to people passionate about building a life or a career in Taiwan helps the nation in both fronts.
 
Like the Taiwan Chia-Nan Irrigation Association member who thought their eyes were deceiving them when they spotted a man and women posing for selfies with the head of a decapitated statue of Yoichi Hatta, a Japanese engineer during Taiwan's colonial occupation, we and many others were shocked by the crime.
 
The final gauntlet of the grueling pension reform process was marred by physical violence Wednesday as protesters moved to block ruling party lawmakers from entering the Legislative Yuan.
 
Li Ming-che, a Taiwanese human rights activist, went to China on March 19 to share his experiences with his Chinese friends. The former Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) staffer went missing not long after his arrival.
 
With around a month to go to the World Health Organization's late-May World Health Assembly, Taiwan still anxiously awaits an invitation.
 
Dear readers, since it was founded in 1952, The China Post has been here, witnessing the changes in Taiwan: from the nation's democratization, to its economic miracle and now its headlong charge into the digital age.
 
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