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Misery persists in Horn of Africa

UNITED NATIONS -- The four Horsemen of the Apocalypse are stalking Somalia and riding further a field into the impoverished the Horn of Africa.

Drought, famine, militias and global indifference plague this parched region at the mercy of weather, failed states, and donor fatigue. Today over 13 million face a deteriorating food and security situation.

Significantly Somalia, long the epicenter of so many African crises, again has gained the tragic limelight as over four million people are affected by drought, famine and internal displacement. Moreover the Islamic Al-Shabab militias have carried out bombings killing 100 in the shattered capital Mogadishu; the group has equally hijacked humanitarian relief.

Supplies

The militias have often banned Western food aid or tried to block its distribution.

After visiting Somalia, Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan lambasted the U.N. and the world community who remained helpless against the pressing problems of today the tragedy of Somalia, where tens of thousands of children died due to the lack of even a piece of bread and a drop of water, is a shame for the international community.

Today the international community is watching the suffering in Somalia like a movie, Erdogan stated bluntly, I will be frank. No one can speak of peace, justice and civilization in the world if the outcry rising from Somalia is left unheard.

Earlier Erdogan told a nervous General Assembly, I feel obliged to state very frankly that today the United Nations does not demonstrate the leadership necessary to help mankind prevail over its fears for the future.

According to the U.N. over 4 million people are affected by drought and famine in Somalia, while a quarter of the country's population is displaced by the crisis.

These are very difficult circumstances not seen in this region in more than a decade, said Elhadj Sy, a UNICEF Regional Director for Eastern Africa .

Describing the dire situation he related that the drought must be seen to the backdrop of ongoing deadly fighting in Somalia.

Thousands had been displaced or had gone into refugee camps across the border to seek safety and basic necessities.

He advised that Kenya's Dabab refugee camp, built to house just 80,000 people, now had a population of some 450,000.

That camp, near the Somali frontier, has become Kenya's third largest city.

The U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) brings the situation into stark focus.

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