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July, 27, 2016

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  Alan Fong    Arthur Cyr    Daniel J. Bauer    
  David Ting    Frank Ching    Jean C. Wen    
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Commentary > China Post
My plane touched down at Dhaka airport at about the time when the joint security operation against terrorists at Gulshan's Holey Artisan Bakery was underway.
 
Isn't the murder of Qandeel Baloch, one of Pakistan's social media stars, as 'un-Islamic' as Zeenat Bibi's?
 
A well-known Kenyan proverb says: When elephants fight, it's the grass that suffers.
 
There is growing concern that countries with territorial disputes will follow the same legal path as the Philippines government and take their cases to the arbitral tribunal that recently ruled in favor of the Manila government.
 
Having been fooled in the past about a news story that later turned out to be a hoax, I am a little leery as I begin here to comment on a report from a pair of local English newspapers last week about an important man named Xi Jinping.
 
The Philippine Left has a gift for mischievous phrase making, and last week's coinage was both obvious and effective. #Chexit, with the now-obligatory hashtag, quickly made the rounds. Inspired by the tumultuous campaign to consider Britain's exit from the European Union, the new catch phrase was code for the legal campaign to force China to "exit" the South China Sea.
 
The summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), held in Warsaw Poland July 8 and 9, has been generally overshadowed by other news. Competition for media attention regarding Europe has been dominated by the British referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU).
 
An international court in The Hague has ruled that China's trump card in its claims in the South China Sea -- its long historical relationship -- as depicted in a nine-dash line shown on official maps enclosing up to 90 percent of the waters has no legal validity in an arbitration case brought by the Philippines.
 
An international tribunal has rejected and rebuffed many of mainland China's claims regarding exclusive sovereignty and rights in the disputed South China Sea.
 
Even before the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague announced in late June that the arbitral tribunal in the case of the Philippines against China will issue its award, or decision, on July 13.
 
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