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1
This homeowner blocked first responders from a dying man because she didn't want an 'unlucky house' — but her plan backfired
2
This was the single mistake that cut power to 6.68 million households
3
CPC's blackout mistake is a lesson about getting the basics right
4
US-North Korea tensions show signs of winding down
5
This haunting 'wind phone' is helping Japanese say goodbye to the departed
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WORLD

A tweet written by ex-US president Obama in the wake of the white supremacist rally has become the most liked one ever. 前美國總統歐巴馬在一個白人至上主義集會發生後發出的推特已經成為最受歡迎的推特。

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TAIWAN

President Tsai Ing-wen apologizedd for Tuesday's massive blackout. 蔡英文總統為週二的大規模停電示歉意。

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LIFE

Melbourne has been named the world's most liveable city for the seventh year in a row. 墨爾本連續第七年被評為世界上最宜居的城市。

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BUSINESS

Passengers on Taiwan's bullet trains can now enjoy free Wi-Fi service as long as they are north of Hsinchu. 在新竹以北的台灣高鐵乘客現在可以享受免費的Wi-Fi服務。

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SPORTS

Liverpool took a step towards the Champions League group phase as they beat Hoffenheim 2-1 in the first leg qualifying playoff. 利物浦向歐冠分組賽邁出一大步,因為他們在第一階段預賽以2-1擊敗了霍芬海姆。

Hot Comment

MOEA seem to be in denial about the severe shortage of electrical power. It really is like a "slow motion car wreck", we can all see it happening from a distance, but nobody is reacting to it.


Gary was commenting on Instead of making pledges about AC, the gov't should be making plans for Taiwan's energy security

特力屋
Opinion
Uncle Sam should let Seoul take the lead on North Korea

Uncle Sam should let Seoul take the lead on North Korea

Developments in the North illustrate the desperate economic and human conditions of its society and the brutal nature of the regime. This provides leverage.
The 2018 mayoral election is a litmus test for Taiwan's China policy

The 2018 mayoral election is a litmus test for Taiwan's China policy

People in both Taiwan and China should watch closely the performance of the pragmatic candidates in 2018. The elections could serve as a bellwether of Taiwan's stance on China relations.
The mysterious ban on a life-saving aircraft

The mysterious ban on a life-saving aircraft

Politicians love helicopters -- quick-moving aircraft that don't need a runway and can get you between meetings while others are stuck in traffic. They are also the key to search and rescue at sea and in mountainous terrain. But in Britain and Norway, a ban on a model well-known across Taiwan has aviation experts shaking their heads. Geoff Hill looks at a modern air mystery.
Japan's new liquor tax laws aren't so bitter for 'real beer' drinkers

Japan's new liquor tax laws aren't so bitter for 'real beer' drinkers

It's time for Japan to start getting into real beer.
Why Canada is better than the US — and why it's not

Why Canada is better than the US — and why it's not

The many similarities between the US and Canada are obvious, but data show that on health care and crime, the Canadians have a distinct edge.
Sooner or later, Washington is going to have to bite the bullet on North Korea

Sooner or later, Washington is going to have to bite the bullet on North Korea

What can and will come of the U.S.-China dialogue on the rogue state's nuclear program?
What to do about the rising tide of refugees?

What to do about the rising tide of refugees?

Over 65 million people worldwide are victims of a score of conflicts, and humanitarian assistance and preventive diplomacy are needed now to solve these calamities.
North Korea and Syria: two evil states

North Korea and Syria: two evil states

Comparing these two powder kegs offers some ideas into how to deal with them.
France votes for moderation — again

France votes for moderation — again

Historically, France suffered after WWII from chronically unstable governments. The rise of Marine Le Pen has raised the specter of that past.
China's focus on Taiwan's weakness may backfire

China's focus on Taiwan's weakness may backfire

Not only is China reducing the number of countries that recognize Taiwan, it's also insisting that nongovernmental relations with Taiwan be tightened.
Could know-how trump aid to Africa?

Could know-how trump aid to Africa?

The U.S. is now talking about giving technology to the developing world instead of money, but Taipei has been doing that for decades.
R.I.P. the architect of German unity

R.I.P. the architect of German unity

Through perseverance and fate, this man from a small West German city became a statesman on the world stage.

Wang Dan's Taiwan independence fancy world

Wang Dan, the most visible student leader in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, is leaving for the United States next month after teaching Chinese history at two of Taiwan's most prestigious national universities for eight years. Before saying goodbye, he warned on the eve of the 27th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre that Taiwan shouldn't talk about independence unless the people are ready to die for the cause.

Can the world hold Duterte to account?

Against the illegal drugs trade in his country, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has let slip the dogs of war -- and the havoc includes thousands of dead Filipinos, most of them poor. As he prepares to mark a year in office at the end of this month, those who are anguished about the killings ask: Can the community of nations play a role in holding Duterte to account?

Britain's earthquake election

The unexpected results of the British general election continue to reverberate. The Conservative Party led by Prime Minister Theresa was generally expected to increase their thin majority in the House of Commons, which forms the government, and thereby move ahead more confidently in implementing their ambitious program.
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