Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.

Chinese, EU solar makers at trade war over dumping

PARIS -- A host of EU solar makers have called on the European Commission to probe alleged dumping practices by its Chinese rivals, as Beijing warned an investigation could trigger a trade war.

EU ProSun, the group of more than 20 European solar companies, called on Brussels to “investigate unfair trade practices by Chinese manufacturers” in a statement Thursday.

The group suspects China of providing its solar players with large loans and other subsidies that allow them to sell their solar cells at prices below their production cost.

“Europe has the world's most advanced and innovative solar industry, but we've fallen on hard times and are faced with bankruptcy filings because of these Chinese products sold at rates that are up to 55 percent below cost production,” EU ProSun President Milan Nitzschke told AFP.

The dumping practice referred to by Nitzschke — also vice-president of German cell maker SolarWorld AG — is banned by the European Union and the World Trade Organization and was at the centre of a recent trade decision.

The United States decided in May to slap hefty anti-dumping duties on Chinese solar cell makers, which Beijing blasted as “protectionist.”

Now the European solar firms want the EU to follow suit with trade defense measures of its own, as they struggle to keep up with their Asian rivals.

According to an International Energy Agency ranking, seven of the world's leading manufacturers of solar modules are Chinese.

Industry pioneer Germany, in particular, has felt the strain, with local solar firms going belly up right up to the industry flagship Q-Cells.

And in France, fellow veteran Photowatt was acquired by a power utility earlier this year after filing for insolvency.

China Fires Back

But with EU solar firms sounding the alarm, China's manufacturers have fired back, calling the dumping allegations “groundless.”

Four leading firms in China warned Thursday that a possible EU anti-dumping investigation could trigger a trade war and urged Beijing to step in to protect their interests.

They called on the Chinese government to block the case by opening dialogue with the European Union in the Thursday statement.

More than 60 percent of China's US$35.8 billion-worth solar shipments were exported to the EU last year while the country imported US$7.5 billion of European solar equipments and raw materials, they said.

A probe “would trigger a full scale trade war between China and Europe,” they said, adding the country is a big market for European products including cars, aircraft, machines and luxury goods.

They added that any move to restrict market access would disrupt global efforts to achieve the goal of saving energy and cutting emissions in the long term.

The companies also said the growth of Chinese solar companies actually helped create most of the EU's current 300,000 jobs in related industries.

Write a Comment
CAPTCHA Code Image
Type in image code
Change the code
 Receive China Post promos
 Respond to this email
Subscribe  |   Advertise  |   RSS Feed  |   About Us  |   Career  |   Contact Us
Sitemap  |   Top Stories  |   Taiwan  |   China  |   Business  |   Asia  |   World  |   Sports  |   Life  |   Arts & Leisure  |   Health  |   Editorial  |   Commentary
Travel  |   Movies  |   TV Listings  |   Classifieds  |   Bookstore  |   Getting Around  |   Weather  |   Guide Post  |   Student Post  |   Terms of Use  |   Sitemap
  chinapost search