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Saturday, November 14, 2015
Is Big always good? How are the biggest companies in the world doing?
Few officials want to acknowledge it but whatever international deal comes out of Paris climate talks, it likely won't be a treaty that needs ratification by a reluctant Republican Party-controlled U.S. Congress.
The flood of advertisements of men's cosmetics have gradually become a force propelling the spending spree on Singles Day, which falls on Nov. 11, and indicating a silent change in Chinese men's perception about looks.
U.S. President Barack Obama has cancelled the Keystone XL, ending a seven-year saga in which the pipeline from Alberta would have provided 800,000 barrels of oil to the U.S. on a daily basis. By scuttling the controversial deal, which has been part of an on again/off again political drama in both Washington and Ottawa, Obama cited environmental concerns and basically threw in the fact that America is awash with more affordable oil, so why do we need Keystone anyway?
In response to procedural maneuvers by the DPP to block his report to the legislature on last week's historic meeting between Taiwan and mainland China in Singapore, President Ma Ying-jeou decided to use his own office to brief the Taiwanese public on the trip's objectives, accomplishments and reaction.
Thursday, November 12, 2015
Six months before Swaziland was cut from a crucial trade deal that allowed it to export products to the United States duty-free, textile worker Maria Matsebula fell to her knees in front of King Mswati III.
Last month's deadly Russian jet crash in Egypt has plunged the north African tourist industry further into crisis, with resorts seen as less risky now likely to benefit from the shifting travel patterns, experts said.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's latest attack on China is about three years behind the times.
Google, Facebook and Twitter are all banned in China, but the Internet giants' top executives are increasingly frequent visitors to Beijing as they seek opportunity and profit from the world's second-largest economy, despite concerns over censorship.
Fed up with record-low interest rates, a growing number of Germany's avid savers are throwing caution to the wind and allowing themselves to be lured by funds offering unbelievable returns.
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