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Friday, December 19, 2014
From a Western perspective, Vladimir Putin's days as president of Russia should be numbered: The ruble has lost more than half its value, the economy is in crisis and his aggression in Ukraine has turned the country into an international pariah.
Jeb Bush has announced he will run for president, and Hillary Clinton is expected to do the same soon. In 2016, the race to the White House could be a family affair.
This year began with some Chinese and American foreign-policy analysts looking back a century to World War I and wondering if confrontation was inevitable between a rising power and a dominant one. But now there has been progress on climate, trade and security issues and what seems a modest “reset” of the Sino-American relationship.
Controversy recently erupted over South Korean a bill aimed at guaranteeing undocumented immigrant children the right to receive education and medical treatment.
Thursday, December 18, 2014
The United States had pushed strongly the independence of South Sudan when it became the world's newest country in 2011.
The growing incidences of violence against journalists involving Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party supporters are extremely worrying. The scenes of young women TV presenters being mobbed and heckled at rallies are the latest example of the party's growing intolerance toward freedom of expression.
Like tea party Republicans on the opposite end of the political spectrum, progressive U.S. Democrats are riding a populist anti-establishment wave, hoping their champion Elizabeth Warren challenges Hillary Clinton for the White House.
Leaders of Qatar seem to have a simple formula for their plans over the next decade: money + sports (equals) global fame.
Wednesday, December 17, 2014
The rout of the Nationalist Party, or Kuomintang (KMT), in Taiwan by the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in local elections on Nov. 29 changed Taiwan's political landscape overnight, making the DPP candidate for president in 2016 the odds-on favorite and possibly marking a change in cross-strait relations.
Whether the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) will be able to reconstruct itself will most likely hinge on how the race to replace DPJ President Banri Kaieda turns out.
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
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