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China declares its intention to locate second oil rig even closer to Vietnam

BEIJING -- China said Thursday it is moving a second oil rig closer to Vietnam's coast, showing its determination to press its territorial claims and continue searching for resources in disputed waters despite a tense confrontation with Vietnam over another oil rig to the south.

The 600-meter-long rig is being towed southeast of its current position south of Hainan Island and will be in its new location closer to Vietnam by Friday, the Maritime Safety Administration said on its website. It asked vessels in the area to give it a wide berth.

Vietnam's government isn't expected to react strongly to the placement of the second rig because it lies far to the north of the politically sensitive waters surrounding the Paracel Islands, where ships from the two countries have been ramming each other for more than 40 days near the first oil rig.

A Vietnamese Foreign Ministry official who spoke on normal condition of anonymity said Hanoi believes that no country should take unilateral action in contested waters, but that China has explored the area previously without causing a crisis in relations.

Vietnamese authorities broke up a small protest against the Chinese move on Thursday. About a dozen people gathered at a park in central Hanoi and chanted slogans such as “Down with Chinese aggression” for several minutes before being dispersed. At least two protesters were taken away.

The shifting of the rig came as officials from both sides said they made no progress in talks Wednesday over the deployment of the other Chinese rig on May 1 that sparked the current standoff. Each country claims the Paracels as its territory and accuses the other of instigating the ship rammings around the rig.

The first rig's deployment triggered anti-China demonstrations across Vietnam that led to attacks on hundreds of factories believed to employ Chinese workers, five of whom were killed and hundreds more injured. Many of the factories were built and run by investors from Taiwan, which has nothing to do with the current dispute.

China's military expelled Vietnamese troops from two of the islands in the group in 1974, and in 1988 used force to kick Vietnam out of Johnson South reef in the Spratly Islands to the east.

The border between China and Vietnam in the area of the second rig near the mouth of the Tonkin Gulf has never been properly demarcated, despite five rounds of talks on the matter.

China claims virtually all of the South China Sea, which is rich in natural resources and crisscrossed by some of the world's busiest sea lanes. That has brought it into dispute with other neighbors, including the Philippines, a U.S. ally.

1 Comment
June 20, 2014    jennygirlmodel@
CHINA OILFIELD SERVICES LIMITED
the world war 3 Shareholders of the CHINA OILFIELD SERVICES LIMITED "Haiyang Shiyou 981" oil rig
J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. (19.01%)
Commonwealth Bank of Australia (14.05%)
T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. and Its Affiliates (6.01%)

China unilaterally launched an air defense identification zone late last year. Plaintiff, BRENDA JUSTICE, 14-CV-1843 Claimed the actions of what appears to be Chinese authorities alleged have caused the "reckless endangerment of her life ... and all human life." Plaintiff alleges that these actions have been taken "so as to take titles to lands[,] waters[,] and airs for the purpose of profiteering [and] piracy." Plaintiff further describes these actions as "racketeering."

Plaintiff states that the basis of jurisdiction for her action is that: this Court has constitutional jurisdiction over treaties so as that force by the United States can not be started even for the right of navigation where Chinese patrol vessels ... block and board foreign ships passing through Chinese-claimed waters and the United States can't use force for the occupation of South China Sea islands without a warrant of this Court. The United States[] may not start the use of force without a warrant of this Court. Bank of A China, has laundered money and used "bank money to finance and exploit fishing, oil and any other commodity in the disputed seas that have not been agreed to by the United Nations." Plaintiff alleges that the actions of Defendant T and the actions of what appears to be Chinese authorities alleged above have caused the "reckless endangerment of her life ... and all human life." Plaintiff alleges that these actions have been taken "so as to take titles to lands, waters[,] and airs for the purpose of profiteering and piracy." Plaintiff further describes these actions as "racketeering."

Plaintiff seeks relief from this Court that would "stop Defendant Bank of A China, from using bank money to finance and exploit fishing, oil or any other commodity in the disputed seas and islands that are not agreed to by the United Nations. " Plaintiff also seeks relief from this

Court that would compel Defendant Bank of A China to "show patriotic support for the United States so that it may run a United States bank." Plaintiff also requests as relief that, "by taking part in this Court, the Republic of China agrees not to shoot at... United States forces on or in any land[,] sea[,] or air and for any dispute of potential shooting war ... to come before this Court to be resolved."
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