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China ethnic tourism draws pros, cons

ZHOUXI, China -- Marching in dragon dances, cheering on buffalo fights, singing folk songs with villagers, an enamored traveler ticked off the sights during a three-week tour of Chinese ethnic minority festivals.

The man — who flew across the country to southwestern Guizhou province to see the colorful traditions — represents both the benefits and downsides of ethnic minority tourism.

“Their culture is a bit more backward, but it's because it's backward that they have this simplicity,” said the traveler, surnamed He, in between recounting local customs and complimenting Miao women in embroidered outfits and towering silver headdresses.

Visitors like him are fueling a domestic Chinese tourism boom that is bringing money to poorer ethnic minority regions and propping up their fading traditions, but that can also encourage commercialism and stereotyping.

He, in his 40s and from northern China, acknowledged that a flood of tourism in other minority areas had doused their authentic feel.

“For those of us who have come to Guizhou early on, and experienced its simplicity, I really don't know if these traditional ways will exist a few years from now,” he lamented.

A third of residents of Guizhou, one of China's poorest provinces, are members of one or other of the country's 55 recognized ethnic minorities, and He was watching a major Miao festival in the township of Zhouxi.

Women with flowers pinned to sweeping hairdos and ribbons draping from waist to floor swayed in sync, as men blared bagpipe-like melodies from long reed pipes.

Nearby stood racks of ethnic costumes for visitors to dress up in for photographs.

Wang Ahua, a 39-year-old dressmaker who cannot write, said she had enjoyed a rise in demand for her costumes, with prices now topping 10,000 yuan (US$1,600).

Visitors did not look down on her and were “very happy, very polite,” she said. “It's good that they come.”

Better Roads

Chinese domestic tourism expanded 10 percent last year, with Chinese logging 3.3 billion trips within their country, generating 2.6 trillion yuan.

Authorities have promoted the sector, along with ethnic tourism, both to generate income and to promote China's image of happy diversity.

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This picture taken on Feb. 19 shows people playing instruments while celebrating the Reed Pipe Festival of the Miao ethnic group in Zhouxi township, Kaili, in southwest China's Guizhou province.

(AFP)

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