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China gives press more freedom on food safety

BEIJING--Toxic bean sprouts, filthy cooking oil, drug-tainted pork: The relentless headlines in Chinese media have churned up queasy feelings for months about the dangers lurking in the nation's dinner bowls.

The stories are grim reading but show China's usually strict censors are allowing the press more latitude to help it monitor a food industry long riddled with problems.

The central government has been cautiously encouraging a sudden burst in food safety muckraking. That's in contrast to before the new food safety campaign, when local officials would delay or quash reporting on food safety or the provincial government had to give permission for coverage of food scandals, said Peter Leedham, a China-based food testing executive.

“It was very tightly controlled. That seems to have gone now. There's much more openness,” said Leedham, the managing director of Eurofins Technology Service in Suzhou.

Few think the looser controls on food reporting signal a broader reform of Chinese media, which remains strictly controlled by the ruling Communist Party. Blogging and publishing are also muzzled, and those who challenge the government risk being harassed or detained. Some, like the writer and Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, have been convicted of inciting to subvert state power for their dissident writings. Liu is currently serving an 11-year prison term.

“Is it a U.S.-style openness?” said Christopher Hickey, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's country director for China. “Clearly not, but I do think it's one of these areas where there is a limited amount of freedom, more than there was in the past.”

Chang Ping, a former columnist fired from the gutsy Southern Metropolis Weekly for his critiques, said reporters have long had a freer hand on food troubles as long as they portray them as isolated rather, than systemic problems.

“The reports may look very free, but in fact they don't push anyone to really consider the root causes of what's going on,” said Chang.

Still, the shift underscores official alarm over the scope of China's food safety problem and a recognition that government inspectors alone aren't going to be able to tackle it.

Zhang Yong, the director of the executive office of the new Cabinet-level Food Safety Commission, recently praised the media's “important watchdog role” after being asked why journalists have frequently been able to find food safety problems before inspectors.

Many challenges lie in the way of cleaning up the rampant use of illegal additives and drugs, which are often churned out by makeshift chemical factories, making them particularly hard to trace.

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 China gives press more freedom on food safety 
Chinese police promote awareness of economic crimes near confiscated counterfeit food products in Beijing on Sunday, May 15. The headlines are unrelenting: toxic bean sprouts, filthy oil, drug-tainted pork. For months, Chinese media have been churning out a queasy-making multitude of stories about the dangers lurking in the nation's dinner bowls. (AP)

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