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Patents developed by Google engineers, not us: Samsung

SAN JOSE, California -- Samsung fired back at Apple's accusations of patent theft Tuesday, saying the South Korean tech giant didn't write any of the Android software on its smartphones and tablets, Google did.

“Not one of the accused features on this phone was designed, much less copied, by anyone at Samsung,” Samsung attorney Peter Quinn said. “The accused features on this phone were developed independently by some of the software engineers at Google, up the road in Mountain View.”

The finger-pointing took place in U.S. District Court in San Jose, where Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are accusing each other of stealing ideas from each other. At stake: more than US$2 billion if Samsung loses, about US$6 million if Apple loses.

On opening day, Google Inc. — which is not named in the litigation — was clearly a large part of it.

The trial marks the latest round in a long-running, worldwide series of lawsuits between Apple and Samsung over mobile devices.

Quinn told jurors that Apple's gripe is with Android, a Google-developed smartphone operating system that now makes up about 70 percent of the global market.

Apple's lawyer Harold McElhinny had anticipated the tactic.

“Don't be misled by that,” he said in his opening statement. “This case is not about Google. It is Samsung that has made the decision to copy these features, it is Samsung, not Google, that chooses to put these features into their phones, and it is Samsung that has made the decision to keep on infringing on Apple's patents.”

Google declined to comment on the controversy.

The trial's first witness, Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, said the relationship between the companies has soured since Samsung launched the Galaxy smartphone.

“It appeared that Samsung was going to be doing a lot of copying of our product. It looked like an attempt to copy the iPhone,” he said.

Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, who died in 2011, was widely invoked throughout opening day.

Apple's McElhinny asked jurors to remember where they were on Jan. 9, 2007, and he shared video of Jobs proudly unveiling the iPhone to cheering crowds that day in San Francisco.

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In this Dec. 12, 2013 file photo, a woman walks by a banner advertising the iPhone 5c at a subway station in Seoul. Opening statements are underway in the latest patent fight over mobile devices between Apple and Samsung, the world's largest cellphone manufacturers. (AP)

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