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Japanese prime minister visits Yasukuni war shrine

TOKYO (AP) — Prime Minister Shinzo Abe paid his respects Thursday at a shrine honoring Japan's war dead in a move that drew sharp rebukes from both China and South Korea who warned that the visit celebrates his country's militaristic past and heightens concerns that Japan may veer back in that direction.

The United States expressed disappointment "that Japan's leadership has taken an action that will exacerbate tensions with Japan's neighbors."

The visit to Yasukuni shrine, which honors 2.5 million war dead including convicted class A war criminals, appears to be a departure from Abe's "pragmatic" approach to leadership, which focused on reviving the economy and tried to avoid alienating neighboring countries.

It was the first visit by a sitting prime minister since Junichiro Koizumi went to mark the end of World War II in 2006.

Visits to Yasukuni by Japanese politicians have long been a point of friction with China and South Korea, because of Japan's brutal aggression during World War II.

Abe, wearing a formal black jacket with tails and striped, gray pants, spent about 15 minutes at the Shinto shrine in central Tokyo. TV cameras followed him inside the shrine property, but were not allowed in the inner shrine.

"I prayed to pay respect for the war dead who sacrificed their precious lives and hoped that they rest in peace," he told waiting reporters immediately afterward.

He said criticism that Yasukuni visits are an act of worshipping war criminals is based on a misunderstanding.

"Unfortunately, a Yasukuni visit has largely turned into a political and diplomatic issue," he said, adding, "It is not my intention to hurt the feelings of the Chinese and Korean people."

He said he believes Japan must never wage war again: "This is my conviction, based on the severe remorse for the past."

His statements failed to assuage China and South Korea.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang, in a statement posted on the ministry's website, said "we strongly protest and seriously condemn the Japanese leader's acts."

He called visits to Yasukuni "an effort to glorify the Japanese militaristic history of external invasion and colonial rule ... and to challenge the outcome of World War II."

He added that "the effort to go against the historical trend is sure to cause great vigilance and strong worries among Asian neighbors and the international community over the direction of Japan's future development."

South Korea's Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism, Yoo Jinryong, labeled the visit "an anachronistic act" that "hurts not only the ties between South Korea and Japan but also fundamentally damages the stability and cooperation in Northeast Asia." His briefing was broadcast live on TV.

A statement released by the U.S. embassy in Tokyo took note of Abe's expression of remorse, but said "the United States hopes that both Japan and its neighbors will find constructive ways to deal with sensitive issues from the past."

Thursday's visit came on the first anniversary of Abe's taking office as prime minister. Abe visited previously when he was not prime minister but not during an earlier one-year term in office in 2006-2007.

Adding to the unease of Japan's neighbors is Abe's support for revising Japan's pacifist constitution and expanding the military at a time of rising tensions over a cluster of uninhabited islands in the East China Sea claimed by both Japan and China.

Japanese political scientist Koichi Nakano said the visit answered questions on whether Abe is a pragmatist or a rabid nationalist.

"I think we know where his beliefs lie," said Nakano, a professor at Sophia University in Tokyo. "He's not in politics because of economics. He's a conviction politician just like Margaret Thatcher was. Pragmatism and conviction don't go very well together."

1 Comment
December 26, 2013    h120069852@
Abe is not in the same class with Margaret Thatcher.
In order to acquire the ballots of specific ethnic groups, he pay a visit to Yasukuni war shrine.
He is provoking regional confrontation.
Thatcher cannot act like Abe.

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, second from right, follows a Shinto priest to pay respect for the war dead at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo Thursday, Dec. 26. Abe visited Yasukuni war shrine in a move sure to infuriate China and South Korea.

(AP)

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