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Anybody home? Pacific island of Niue hit by exodus

ALOFI, Niue--It was a school once, but there are no children here anymore. The lonely building on this remote Pacific island now contains only a punching bag that someone has strung from the classroom rafters, and a note scrawled on the chalkboard in Niuean: “Keep this place clean,” it says, “so it stays beautiful.”

While much of the world worries about how it will accommodate rapidly growing populations, some islands in the Pacific face the opposite dilemma: how to stop everybody from leaving.

The population decline on Niue, a lush coral atoll about the size of Baltimore, has been steady and relentless. In the 1960s, there were more than 5,000 people living here; today, there are fewer than 1,600. Fifteen times as many Niueans, some 24,000, now live across the ocean in New Zealand, 2,400 kilometers (1,500 miles) away.

The stories, songs and language that developed into the Niuean culture over more than 1,000 years are at risk of vanishing.

Speedo Hetutu, 54, attended the old school in the town of Avatele before it was abandoned and later used for workouts. There used to be six primary schools on the island; now there is only one. Other buildings where people used to work, pray or live now sit empty and in disrepair.

“People wanted to go away to look for a better life,” Hetutu says. “People are still searching.”

Other Pacific islands face similar struggles. The CIA estimates the population of the Cook Islands is declining by 3 percent per year, a rate second only to war-torn Syria.

Tokelau and American Samoa are also losing significant numbers of people. Even on archipelagos like Samoa and Tonga where the population is steady, people are abandoning the outer islands and moving to the main towns, where they can find better jobs, education and health care.

The exodus from Niue has been particularly acute because of its connection with New Zealand. Niue is self-governing but in free association with its wealthier neighbor to the south, and Niueans are automatically New Zealand citizens.

While that relationship has lured away thousands of young Niueans, it has also paid the bills for those who have remained. New Zealand has helped establish a US$44 million trust fund and gives annual aid that amounts to about US$10,000 per resident, helping fund the government work that accounts for most of the island's jobs. Some Niueans living abroad send back remittances.

Many of those who left had goals that were simply too big for the island. Professor John Connell, a South Pacific expert at the University of Sydney, recalls speaking with a nurse who specialized in neonatal care and had returned for her father's funeral.

“There was no point in her being in Niue,” Connell says. “She could only be there if she was prepared to lose her high-powered skills, and she didn't want to do that.”

Niueans see New Zealand as a land filled with opportunity, says the Rev. Falkland Liuvaie, 52, a Presbyterian minister who moved to its capital, Wellington, seven years ago.

He delivers a weekly sermon in both Niuean and English which he says gives many expats their only opportunity to listen to their language. He says for the first few years he gave his services only in Niuean, until he realized many people had difficulty understanding him.

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A boy jumps from a wharf in Alofi, Niue on June 4. Severe population decline on the tiny Pacific atoll is threatening a culture that dates back more than 1,000 years. (AP)

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