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Thousands of Japanese kids end up in institutions: HRW

TOKYO--Almost nine out of 10 children taken from their families in Japan end up in institutions rather than foster care, a rights group said Thursday, a rate it said was the highest among developed nations.

Just 12 percent of children who have been removed from their natural parents are placed with foster families, leaving tens of thousands of other youngsters to languish in understaffed children's homes, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said.

That figure is the lowest in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a club of rich nations, and is just a fraction of that in Australia, where 93.5 percent of these children live in a family home.

“It's heartbreaking to see children crammed into institutions and deprived of the chance for life in a caring family setting,” said Kanae Doi, Japan director at Human Rights Watch.

“While other developed countries place most vulnerable children in family based care, in Japan, a shocking 90 percent end up in institutions.”

In neighboring South Korea, 43.6 percent of children end up in foster care. In the United States, it is 77.0 percent, while in Britain it is 71.7 percent.

The 119-page report says 39,000 children in Japan have been removed from their families by the authorities, who determined their parents were either unable or unwilling to look after them.

The report, compiled over a three-year period, found Japan's child guidance centers — the local administrative bodies charged with dealing with children in care — are “predisposed to institutionalizing children rather than placing them in adoption or foster care.”

“These centers often defer to the preference of biological parents to place the child in an institution rather than with a foster family, or seek to

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Japan's director of Human Rights Watch, Kanae Doi, left, announces the results of an investigation into Japan's orphanages and foster parent system at a press conference in Tokyo, yesterday.

(AFP

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