News Videos
World
International Edition

Sunday

July 23, 2017

Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.
About Us
E-Newsletter
Advertise
Contact Us

Japan nuclear crisis crew not told of danger at Fukushima: worker

IWAKI, Japan -- The operator of a Japanese nuclear plant that went into a tsunami-triggered meltdown knew the risks from highly radioactive water at the site but sent in crews without adequate protection or warnings, a worker said in a legal complaint.

The actions by Tokyo Electric Power Co. led to radiation injuries, said the contract worker, who was with a six-member team working at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi plant's Unit 3 reactor in the early days of last year's crisis.

The worker gave a rare public account of what happened at the plant during the accident. He spoke to The Associated Press on the condition that he be identified only as Shinichi, his given name.

Shinichi, 46, described a harrowing scene of darkness and fear, wading with headlamps into a flooded basement through steaming radioactive water that felt warm even through workers' boots.

"It was outrageous. We shouldn't even have been there," he said.

He said his six-member team was sent to lay electric cables in the basement of the Unit 3 turbine on March 24, 10 days after its reactor building exploded, spewing massive amounts of radiation into the environment. Their mission was to restore power to pumps to inject cooling water into its overheating spent fuel pool.

Shinichi said TEPCO and its primary subcontractor never warned them even though water leaks had been found elsewhere at the plant.

Asked about Shinichi's allegations, TEPCO spokesman Yoshimi Hitosugi said the plant was aware of water leaks elsewhere but couldn't anticipate the water problem in Unit 3's basement.

Shinichi's radiation exposure that day alone exceeded half the government's annual exposure limit, and he had to stop working on plant jobs soon afterward.

Out of fear of harassment of his family due to the tendency of some Japanese to stigmatize those perceived as different or as troublemakers, Shinichi agreed to speak with the AP and several Japanese reporters on condition his face not be photographed.

On Tuesday, he filed a complaint with a labor standards office in Fukushima, asking authorities to confirm TEPCO's safety violations and issue improvement orders. He also is seeking penalties — up to six months in jail or fines of up to 500,000 yen (US$6,250) under the Industrial Safety and Health Act — against the company that supervised him.

Shinichi's direct employer — the subcontractor for TEPCO — stopped calling him for jobs in March, just telling him to stand by. He now works on radiation decontamination of "hot spots" in Fukushima prefecture.

"So I decided I've had enough of this unjust treatment. That's why I decided to come forward," he said.

MOST POPULAR OF THIS SECTION
1
Former Khmer Rouge leader blatantly lies about genocide
2
Taiwanese arrive in Cambodia to urge that fraud suspects be sent home — not to China
3
A woman died from poisoned coffee and now the cafe's business is booming
4
South Korea's president told Obama that the North has 'last chance' for dialogue
5
The American cop who shot dead an Australian woman 'is refusing talk'
6
Taiwanese who allegedly impersonated police in Singapore get taken to the scene of the crime
7
LATEST: Kim promises more missile test 'gift packages'
8
UPDATE: Death toll rises to 7 in southwestern Japan floods; princess delays engagement announcement
9
A journalist with close ties to the Japanese PM is being accused of rape
10
Protesters have turned out to support a Taiwanese man's landmark same-sex court case in Japan
Advertise  |   RSS Feed  |   About Us  |   Contact Us
Home  |   Taiwan  |   China  |   Business  |   Asia  |   World  |   Sports  |   Life  |  
Arts & Leisure  |   Health  |   Editorial  |   Commentary Travel  |   Movies  |   Guide Post  |   Terms of Use  |  
  chinapost search