Breaking News, World News and Taiwan News.
 
 
 
Myanmar
 

Thai soccer fans can watch the whole World Cup at home for free thanks to an intervention by the junta to spread “happiness” after a military coup last month.
 

Thailand's contender for the Miss Universe beauty pageant has relinquished her crown after she allegedly called for supporters of the ousted government to be “executed,” sparking a social media furor.
Miss Universe Thailand quits after political furor

 

Activists protesting last month's military coup in Thailand face a possible two-year jail term if they get too strident, so on Sunday they found a new way to show their sentiments: handing out “sandwiches for democracy.”
 

Thai police arrested seven anti-coup protesters after a flashmob rally held Sunday outside a Bangkok shopping centre in defiance of thousands of security forces deployed city-wide to enforce a ban on political gatherings.
Arrests as gov't curbs Thai anti-coup flashmobs

 

Cheer up, Thailand. That's an order. The military junta that seized power here last month has no plans to restore civilian rule any time soon. But it has launched an official campaign to bring back something else it says this divided nation desperately needs — happiness.
Cheer up, Thailand! Junta aims to return happiness

 

Thailand's junta said Friday that it had captured a fugitive anti-coup leader facing possible imprisonment, as the ruling generals seek to stamp out any criticism of their seizure of power.
 

Thailand's junta said Friday that it had captured a fugitive anti-coup leader facing possible imprisonment, as the ruling generals seek to stamp out any criticism of their seizure of power.
Thailand's junta detains anti-coup leader

 

In junta-ruled Thailand, the simple act of reading in public has become an act of resistance.
 

Thailand's coup leaders faced fresh international condemnation Saturday when U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel demanded immediate elections and the release of detainees held by a junta which says there will be no polls for at least a year.
 

In his first address to the public since taking control of Thailand in a bloodless coup, the head of the military junta said it could take more than a year for new elections to be held because peace and reforms must be achieved first.
Thai junta: Elections could take more than 1 year

 

Stuck for hours each day in snarling traffic, bus conductors in Thailand's sprawling capital have found a radical solution to a lack of toilet breaks — adult diapers.
Diaper-wearing Thai bus conductors fight for rights

 

Thailand's junta Wednesday freed leaders of the “Red Shirt” movement allied to the ousted government, as social media users reacted with alarm to rumors of a “block” of Facebook.
Thai 'Red Shirts' freed as Facebook 'block' sows panic

 

Thai soldiers swooped to detain a fugitive former cabinet minister on Tuesday after he emerged from hiding to become the first member of the ousted government to publicly denounce a military coup.
Thai troops swoop on former minister

 

The military coup will neither restore investor confidence in Thailand nor help its economy to avoid a cut in its growth forecast this year of 2-3 percentage points from its pre-crisis 4.5 percent if the political impasse persists for the rest of the year, according to Moody's Investors Service. Moody's said in its updated “Credit Outlook” publication yesterday that last Thursday, the Army suspended the Constitution and ousted the government, two days after declaring martial law.
 
Calendar     
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10    <   Prev    Next   >
Subscribe  |   Advertise  |   RSS Feed  |   About Us  |   Career  |   Contact Us
Sitemap  |   Top Stories  |   Taiwan  |   China  |   Business  |   Asia  |   World  |   Sports  |   Life  |   Arts & Leisure  |   Health  |   Editorial  |   Commentary
Travel  |   Movies  |   TV Listings  |   Classifieds  |   Bookstore  |   Getting Around  |   Weather  |   Guide Post  |   Student Post  |   Terms of Use  |   Sitemap
  chinapost search